Miscellanea curiosa: Containing a collection of some of the principal phænomena in nature, accounted for by the greatest philosophers of this age: being the most valuable discourses, read and delivered to the Royal society, for the advancement of physical and mathematical knowledge. As also a collection of curious travels, voyages, antiquities, and natural histories of countries; presented to the same society... (Google eBook)

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Printed by J.M. for R. Smith, 1708 - Science
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Page 21 - Parabola, is easily compensated in determining the situation of the Orbit. The principal use therefore, of this Table of the Elements of their Motions, and that which indeed induced me to construct it, is, that whenever a new Comet shall appear, we may be able to know, by comparing together the Elements, whether it be any of those which has appear'd before, and consequently to determine its Period, and the Axis of its Orbit, and to foretell its Return. And, indeed...
Page 317 - This Explofion, if high in the Air, and far from us? will do no Mifchief, or not confiderable ; like a parcel of Gun-powder fired in the open Air, where is nothing near to be hurt by it: But if near, to us (or among us) it may kill Men or Cattle, tear Trees, fire Gunpowder, break Houfes, or the like; as Gun-powder would do ia like Circumftances.
Page 42 - But if the ratio of a to b be fuppofed divided into two parts, viz.. into the ratio of a to the Arithmetical Mean between the terms, and the ratio of the faid Arithmetical Mean to the other term...
Page 38 - Now thefe rativncula are fb to be underflood as in a continued Scale of Proportionals infinite in Number between the two terms of the ratio, . which infinite Number of mean Proportionals is to that infinite Number of the like and equal...
Page 42 - And this Series converges twice as fwift as the former, and therefore is more proper for the Practice of making...
Page 44 - Direction of the Theorem, efpecially where x is fmall and Integer, referving the proper Quotes to be added together, when you have produced your Logarithm to as many Figures as you defire : Of which Method I will give a Specimen.
Page 24 - Sun to the Northwards of the Way of the Earth. At which Time, had the Earth been there, the Comet would have had a Parallax equal to that of the Moon, as I take it. This is fpoken to...
Page 52 - ... this be a matter purely arithmetical, nor properly demonftrable from the principles of geometry. Nor have I been obliged to have recourfe to the method of indivifibles, or the arithmetick of infinites, the whole being no other than an eafy corollary to Mr. Newton's General Theorem for forming Roots and Powers.
Page 192 - ... take notice, that by the Exponent of a Letter , I mean the Number which exprefles what Place it has in the Alphabet ; thus 4 is the Exponent of the Letter D) hence I derive this Rule for finding the Capital Letters of all the Members that belong to any Power ; Combine the Capital Letters...
Page 39 - Proportionals, and between i and 3 there will be 477 12 &c. of them ; which Numbers therefore are the Logarithms of the Rationes of i to 10, i to 2, and i to 3 ; and not fo properly to be called the Logaithms of 10, 2 and 3.

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