Empire star

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Gregg Press, 1977 - Fiction - 87 pages
30 Reviews

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Wonderful ending - very imaginative. - Goodreads
The thing that really did it for me was the ending. - Goodreads
Delany is a wonderful writer. - Goodreads
My introduction to Delany, and author I enjoy. - Goodreads

Review: Empire Star

User Review  - Andrewcharles420 - Goodreads

Comet Jo witnesses a spaceship crash landing on his backwoods planet and agrees to carry their message to the center of the galaxy. He encounters many interesting and enlightening entities on the way ... Read full review

Review: Empire Star

User Review  - Tina - Goodreads

I apologize for the brevity of this post, but I read this over a week ago and all I can recall is that it was enjoyable, complex but not complicated, and I liked the characters quite a bit. Jo grows ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
71
Copyright

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About the author (1977)

Samuel R. Delany Jr., celebrated science fiction and short story writer, was born in Harlem, N.Y., in 1942 to Samuel Ray and Margaret Carey. Delany suffered from dyslexia, which was not diagnosed until he attended the prestigious Bronx High School of Science, where he also met his future wife and where he began publishing short stories that won high school literary awards. Delany's first novel, The Jewels of Aptor, was published in 1962. It established the direction his later works would take by exploring the ways in which myth shapes our cultural beliefs. Delany also examines topics such as alternative love and sex relationships, mythic elements in the imagination, issues of communications and community, and the role of the artist in society. Delany has written more than 20 novels and collections of short stories, memoirs, and critical essays. His many awards include the Nebula Award for Best Novel for Babel-17 in 1966 and The Einstein Intersection in 1967, the Hugo Award for best short story, Science Fiction Convention, for "Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones" in 1970, and the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement in Gay Literature in 1993.

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