Theory of Elasticity

Front Cover
Elsevier, Jan 1, 1986 - Science - 187 pages
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A comprehensive textbook covering not only the ordinary theory of the deformation of solids, but also some topics not usually found in textbooks on the subject, such as thermal conduction and viscosity in solids.


  

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Review: Theory of Elasticity (Theoretical Physics, Volume 7)

User Review  - Lynn - Goodreads

Stalled in reading, and someone from the library requested the copy I had. It's good, but not sure if I'll pick it back up or not. Maybe someday... Read full review

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Contents

FUNDAMENTAL EQUATIONS 1 The strain tensor
1
2 The stress tensor
3
3 The thermodynamics of deformation
7
4 Hookes law
9
5 Homogeneous deformations
11
6 Deformations with change of temperature
14
7 The equations of equilibrium for isotropic bodies
16
8 Equilibrium of an elastic medium bounded by a plane
22
26 Anharmonic vibrations
104
DISLOCATIONS 27 Elastic deformations in the presence of a dislocation
108
28 The action of a stress field on a dislocation
116
29 A continuous distribution of dislocations
119
30 Distribution of interacting dislocations
124
31 Equilibrium of a crack in an elastic medium
127
32 The equation of thermal conduction in solids
133
33 Thermal conduction in crystals
134

9 Solid bodies in contact
26
10 The elastic properties of crystals
32
THE EQUILIBRIUM OF RODS AND PLATES 11 The energy of a bent plate
38
12 The equation of equilibrium for a plate
40
13 Longitudinal deformations of plates
46
14 Large deflections of plates
50
15 Deformations of shells 34
54
16 Torsion of rods
59
17 Bending of rods
64
18 The energy of a deformed rod
67
19 The equations of equilibrium of rods
70
20 Small deflections of rods
76
21 The stability of elastic systems
83
ELASTIC WAVES 22 Elastic waves in an isotropic medium
87
23 Elastic waves in crystals
92
24 Surface waves
94
25 Vibration of rods ahd plates
99
34 Viscosity of solids
135
35 The absorption of sound in solids
137
36 Highly viscous fluids
142
37 Static deformations of nematics
144
38 Straight disclinations in nematics
147
39 Nonsingular axially symmetrical solution of the equilibrium equations for a nematic
152
40 Topological properties of disclinations
156
41 Equations of motion of nematics
158
42 Dissipative coefficients of nematics
163
43 Propagation of small oscillations in nematics
165
44 Mechanics of cholesterics
170
45 Elastic properties of smectics
172
46 Dislocations in smectics
177
47 Equations of motion of smectics
179
48 Sound in smectics
182
Index
185
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About the author (1986)

Lev Davidovich Landau was born on January 22, 1908 in Baku, U.S.S.R (now Azerbaijan). A brilliant student, he had finished secondary school by the age of 13. He enrolled in the University of Baku a year later, in 1922, and later transferred to the University of Leningrad, from which he graduated with a degree in physics. Landau did graduate work in physics at Leningrad's Physiotechnical Institute, at Cambridge University in England, and at the Institute of Theoretical Physics in Denmark, where he met physicist Neils Bohr, whose work he greatly admired. Landau worked in the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons program during World War II, and then began a teaching career. Considered to be the founder of a whole school of Soviet theoretical physicists, Landau was honored with numerous awards, including the Lenin Prize, the Max Planck Medal, the Fritz London Prize, and, most notably, the 1962 Nobel Prize for Physics, which honored his pioneering work in the field of low-temperature physics and condensed matter, particularly liquid helium. Unfortunately, Landau's wife and son had to accept the Nobel Prize for him; Landau had been seriously injured in a car crash several months earlier and never completely recovered. He was unable to work again, and spent the remainder of his years, until his death in 1968, battling health problems resulting from the accident. Landau's most notable written work is his Course of Theoretical Physics, an eight-volume set of texts covering the complete range of theoretical physics. Like several other of Landau's books, it was written with Evgeny Lifshitz, a favorite student, because Landau himself strongly disliked writing. Some other works include What is Relativity?, Theory of Elasticity, and Physics for Everyone.