Legends, Monsters, Or Serial Murderers?: The Real Story Behind an Ancient Crime

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ABC-CLIO, 2012 - Social Science - 202 pages
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The majority of serial murder studies support the consensus that serial murder is essentially an American crime--a flawed assumption, as the United States has existed for less than 250 years. What is far more likely is that the perverse urge to repeatedly and intentionally kill has existed throughout human history, and that a substantial percentage of serial murders throughout ancient times, the middle ages, and the pre-modern era were attributed to imaginative surrogate explanations: dragons, demons, vampires, werewolves, and witches.

"Legends, Monsters, or Serial Murderers? The Real Story Behind an Ancient Crime" dispels the interrelated misconceptions that serial murder is an American crime and a relatively recent phenomenon, making the novel argument that serial murder is a historic reality--an unrecognized fact in ancient times. Noted serial murderers such as the Roman Locuta (The Poisoner); Gilles De Rais of France, a prolific serial killer of children; Andres Bichel of Bavaria; and Chinese aristocratic serial killer T'zu-Hsi are spotlighted. This book provides a unique perspective that integrates supernatural interpretations of serial killing with the history of true crime, reanimating mythic entities of horror stories and presenting them as real criminals.

  

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Contents

1 Invisible Serial Murder
1
Vampire Serial Killers
11
Werewolf Serial Killers
33
Witch Serial Killers
69
Aristocratic Serial Killers
91
Commercial Serial Killers
119
Notes
155
Bibliography
195
Index
199
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About the author (2012)

DIRK C. GIBSON is Associate Professor of Communication and Journalism at the University of New Mexico. He has published numerous articles on a variety of topics in such journals as Public Relations Quarterly, Public Relations Review, and Southern Communication Journal. He has also published several book chapters and two books, The Role of Communication in the Practice of Law (1991) and Clues from Killers (Praeger, 2004).

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