Poems, New and Collected, 1957-1997

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Harcourt, Incorporated, 2000 - Poetry - 273 pages
40 Reviews
Described by Robert Hass as "unquestionably one of the great living European poets" and by Charles Simic as "one of the finest poets living today," Szymborska mesmerizes her readers with poetry that captivates their minds and captures their hearts. This is the book that her many fans have been anxiously awaiting-the definitive, complete collection of poetry by the Nobel Prize-winning poet, including 164 poems in all, as well as the full text of her Nobel acceptance speech of December 7, 1996, in Stockholm. Beautifully translated by Stanislaw Bara«nczak and Clare Cavanagh, who won a 1996 PEN Translation Prize for their work, this volume is a must-have for all readers of poetry.

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Review: Poems New and Collected

User Review  - Andrea - Goodreads

Somehow I had never really read Szymborska. I'm not sure how that is possible, but there you have it - there are always more writers to be read and "discovered," not discovered by the world in general ... Read full review

Review: Poems New and Collected

User Review  - Felix Purat - Goodreads

It's too bad I had to return this book to the library: only halfway through, and I am only now starting to understand the way the mighty Polish poetess Wisława Szymborska actually works, at least in ... Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Wislawa Szymborska was born in Bnin, Poland on July 2, 1923. After the Nazis invaded Poland in September 1939, she found work as a railway clerk to avoid deportation to Germany as a forced laborer. In her free time, she studied at illegal underground universities. After World War II, she resumed her formal studies in Polish literature and sociology at Jagiellonian University, but never earned a degree. In 1945, she published her first poem, I Am Looking for a Word, in a weekly supplement to the local newspaper. Her first book of poetry was published in 1952. Her other volumes of poetry include View with a Grain of Sand, People on a Bridge, Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts: Seventy Poems, and Here. In 1991 she won the Goethe Prize and in 1995 she was awarded the Herder Prize. She won the Nobel Prize for Poetry in 1996 and was awarded The Order of the White Eagle in recognition of her contribution to her country's culture in 2011. From 1953 to 1981, she worked as a poetry editor and columnist for the literary weekly Literary Life, where she wrote a column called Non-Required Reading. She died of lung cancer on February 1, 2012 at the age of 88.

Baranczak received the 1996 PEN translation prize for View With A Grain Of Sand.

Cavanagh received the 1996 PEN Translation Prize for View With A Grain Of Sand.

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