Graphic Japan: From Woodblock and Zen to Manga and Kawaii

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RotoVision, 2004 - Design - 223 pages
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From the kitsch cuteness of the ubiquitous Hello Kitty to the cult of manga and anime, Japanese design has long paved the way for the West to follow. Graphic Japan goes beyond this well-known territory to reveal the myriad styles of design produced in Japan today, from packaging to posters, typography to new media. Contemporary Japanese graphic design is a unique collision of traditional cultural influences and a focused thrust towards modernization on global terms. No other country has found itself modernized so quickly while retaining such a distinct way of life, and the resulting graphic innovation enthralls the world. Divided into distinct sections, the book reflects the marriage of tradition and hyper-modernity that typifies Japanese design. Essays on today?s innovators are beautifully printed in a simple, elegant manner typical of traditional Japanese work, while visual matter is boldly, colorfully printed, reflecting the brash, global commerciality of much new material. Japanese design embodies the holy grail of creative freedom and commercial success?this book is an inspirational ?must? for designers in the West.
  

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"This is a lovely little book about contemporary Japanese graphic design with a wealth of interesting and very diverse examples and intelligent comment."
Grafik magazine
From the kitsch cuteness
of the ubiquitous Hello Kitty to the cult of manga and anime, Japanese design has long paved the way for the West to follow. Graphic Japan goes beyond this well-known territory to reveal the myriad styles of design produced in Japan today, from packaging to posters, typography to new media.
Contemporary Japanese graphic design is a unique collision of traditional cultural influences and a focused thrust towards modernisation on global terms. No other country has found itself modernised so quickly while retaining such a distinct way of life, and the resulting graphic innovation enthralls the world. Divided into distinct sections, the book reflects the marriage of tradition and hyper-modernity that typifies Japanese design. Essays on today’s innovators are beautifully printed in a simple, elegant manner typical of traditional Japanese work, while visual matter is boldly, colourfully printed, reflecting the brash, global commerciality of much new material.
The graphic lifeblood of Tokyo is showcased in another book, Graphiscape Tokyo.
About The Author
Natalie Avella is a prolific design writer, having worked for Grafik and Village Voice in New York, where she lived for some time. She has also authored Paper Engineering for RotoVision.
She lives and works in London, UK.
 

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 17
Section 18

Section 9
Section 10
Section 19
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Natalie Avella is a prolific design writer who has worked for Village Voice and Graphics International in New York. The author of Graphic Japan for RotoVision, she lives in London, UK.

Bibliographic information