A World Survey of Religion and the State

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Cambridge University Press, May 19, 2008 - Social Science
This book delves into the extent of government involvement in religion between 1990 and 2002 using both quantitative and qualitative methodology. The study is based on the Religion and State dataset, which includes 175 governments across the globe, all of which are addressed individually in this book. The forms of involvement examined in this study include whether the government has an official religion, whether some religions are given preferential treatment, religious discrimination against minority religion, government regulation of the majority religion, and religious legislation. The study shows that government involvement in religion is ubiquitous, that it increased significantly during this period, and that only a minority of states, including a minority of democracies, have separation of religion and state. These findings contradict the predictions of religion's reduced public significance found in modernization and secularization theory. The findings also demonstrate that state religious monopolies are linked to reduced religious participation.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 The Question of Religions Role in Politics and Society
12
3 Quantifying Religion
32
4 Global GIR from 1990 to 2002
62
5 Western Democracies
105
6 The Former Soviet Bloc
140
7 Asia
181
8 The Middle East and North Africa
218
9 SubSaharan Africa
249
10 Latin America
290
11 Patterns and Trends
313
12 Conclusions
352
Data Collection and Reliability
365
Bibliography
369
Index
381

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