Academic Freedom in Hong Kong

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Lexington Books, 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 192 pages
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In Academic Freedom in Hong Kong, Jan Currie, Carole J. Petersen, and Ka Ho Mok explore the unique situation in Hong Kong, a tiny jurisdiction in which there is active protection for the freedom of expression despite the close proximity and relationship with mainland China. Hong Kong scholars and intellectuals assume the responsibility of public critics, but this is not without an element of crisis. The authors draw upon interviews with academics and university administrators and examine two historical incidents that led to a strengthening of academic freedom, as well as the legal and political ramifications affecting the present and future. This book will interest East Asian scholars and academics in universities around the world where freedom of expression is threatened in this time of heightened security.
 

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Contents

Academic Freedom as a Concept
15
Legitimacy Crises in Hong Kong
47
The Robert Chung Affair
65
The Challenge
89
Academics Views on Academic Freedom in Hong Kong
107
Hong Kong Academics Behavior Regarding Academic Freedom
131
Conclusion
145
Appendixes
157
References
171
Index
187
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About the author (2006)

Jan Currie is professor emeritus in the Centre for Social and Community Research at Murdoch University.

Carole J. Petersen is associate professor in the faculty of law and former director of the Centre for Comparative and Public Law at the University of Hong Kong.

Ka Ho Mok is chair in East Asian Studies and director of the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Bristol and the former Associate Dean in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the City University of Hong Kong.

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