Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made

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Chatto & Windus, 2014 - Global environmental change - 436 pages
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Lively, illuminating explanation of new scientific term the Anthropocene -- the age of man -- through the stories of people living on its frontline
Scientists are agreed that we are at the start of a new epoch, called the Anthropocene, the first to be defined and determined by only one organim -- man.
We all know our planet is in crisis, and it 's our fault. But all too often it 's hard to get a full picture of what 's really going on, what it all means, from all the facts and stats. So Gaia Vince, news editor of the science journal "Nature," decided to travel the world to see for herself what life is really like for people on the frontline of this new age.
Gaia found people doing the most extraordinary things. Take the man who is making artificial glaciers in Nepal, for example, or the one who' s painting mountains white to attract snowfall; take the electrified reefs of the Maldives; or the man who 's making islands out of rubbish in the Caribbean. These are ordinary people who are solving severe crises in crazy, ingenious, effective ways. These wonderful stories, combined with the new science that underpins Gaia 's expertise and research, make for a persuasive, illuminating and very hopeful read about what the Anthropocene means for all of us and how we are to survive the coming centuries."

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ADVENTURES IN THE ANTHROPOCENE: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Science journalist Vince chronicles a two-year journey around the globe to evaluate warnings that we face an ecological tipping point."Deserts are spreading…forests are dying and being logged ... Read full review

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About the author (2014)

GAIA VINCE is a journalist and broadcaster specialising in science and the environment. She has been the front editor of the journal Nature Climate Change, the news editor of Nature and online editor of New Scientist. She writes for newspapers including the Guardian, The Times, Science, Scientific American, Australian Geographic, Seed and the Australian. She devises and presents programmes about the Anthropocene on BBC radio, blogs at WanderingGaia.com and tweets at @WanderingGaia.

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