Australia and the British Embrace: The Demise of the Imperial Ideal

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Melbourne University Press, 2001 - History - 307 pages
An interpretation of the demise of the traditional ties between Australia and Great Britain during the 1960s. Until a generation ago 'Britishness' lay at the heart of Australian political culture. This text gives a viewpoint of how the idea of Britishness lost its meaning for Australians and their political institutions. Argues that the transformation was due not to the traditional view of Australia's growing nationalism, but rather to Britain's move away from 'Empire' towards the European Economic Community. Includes notes, bibliography and index. Author is a lecturer in history at the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, King's College, London, and at the University of Southern Denmark. He previously wrote 'Courting the Common Market' and 'British Culture at the End of Empire'.

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Contents

Sentiment and Selfinterest
13
not just another European country
41
A Matter of Preference
69
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Stuart Ward completed his Ph.D. at the University of Sydney and is now a lecturer in history at the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, King's College, London, and at the University of Southern Denmark. He is the editor of Courting the Common Market (with R. T. Griffiths, 1996) and British Culture and the End of Empire (2001).

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