Brands: The Logos of the Global Economy

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Taylor & Francis, Jul 30, 2004 - Business & Economics - 208 pages
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Brands are everywhere: in the air, on the high-street, in the kitchen, on television and, maybe even on your feet. But what are they?

The brand, that point of connection between company and consumer, has become one of the key cultural forces of our time and one of the most important vehicles of globalization. This book offers a detailed and innovative analysis of the brand

Illustrated with many examples, the book argues that brands:
* mediate the supply and demand of products and services in a global economy
* frame the activities of the market by functioning as an interface
* communicate interactively, selectively promoting and inhibiting communication between producers and
consumers
* operate as a public currency while being legally protected as private property in law
* introduce sensation, qualities and affect into the quantitative calculations of the market
* organize the logics of global flows of products, people, images and events.

This book will be essential reading for students of sociology, cultural studies and consumption.

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About the author (2004)

For a long time I have had two main areas of research interest: sociology of culture and feminist theory. My contributions to a sociology of culture draw upon the findings of a series of funded empirical research projects, exploring contemporary developments in the culture industry with a special focus on changing cultural forms. Following the publication of the jointly authored book on The Global Culture Industry: The Mediation of Things (with Lash, Polity, 2007), I am developing my research interest in the question of cultural change through my participation in a 20-partner EU-funded interdisciplinary network on A Topological Approach to Cultural Dynamics . This network which draws on recent developments in philosophy and mathematical thinking to address questions of cultural and social change, space and intensity is part of what has been called a topological turn in cultural theory. My ideas on what this might mean are developed in recent and forthcoming publications including the Introduction to a Special Issue of the European Journal of Social Theory on What is the empirical?, co-edited with Lisa Adkins and an article on Brands as assemblage: assembling culture to appear in the journal Cultural Economy (forthcoming). It will also inform the book (co-edited with Nina Wakeford) on Inventive Methods, (Routledge). I continue to be interested in brands and branding (Brands: the logos of the global cultural economy, 2004 as I have found them illuminating objects to think with as well as problematic objects to live with/out. I am enthusiastic about the new MA in Brands, Communication and Culture that is just starting at Goldsmiths (organised by Dr Liz Moor in Media and Communications, but with the involvement of myself and others in Sociology). My contributions to feminist theory primarily concern the issue of gender as a kind of becoming (Prosthetic Culture, Feminism and Autobiography) and the changing significance of gender as a social and natural category (Global Nature, Global Culture). I have participate in the annual conferences and workshops linked to the MA Gender, Culture and Media.

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