Everybody Was Kung Fu Fighting: Afro-Asian Connections and the Myth of Cultural Purity

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Beacon Press, Nov 18, 2002 - Social Science - 232 pages
Selected as One of the Village Voice's Favorite 25 Books of 2001

In this landmark work, historian Vijay Prashad refuses to engage the typical racial discussion that matches people of color against each other while institutionalizing the primacy of the white majority. Instead he examines more than five centuries of remarkable historical evidence of cultural and political interaction between Blacks and Asians around the world, in which they have exchanged cultural and religious symbols, appropriated personas and lifestyles, and worked together to achieve political change.
 

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Psuedo-intellectual, this book has some very good ideas and good points but htey get lost along the way. the author deals in totalities, making grand statements without reference and then referring to them later as if the were fact. Also he chooses certain sentence constructions and uses them over and over to the point of exhaustion. WOULD NOT RECOMMEND.  

Selected pages

Contents

The Strange Career of Xenophobia
1
The American Ideology
37
Coolie Purana
70
The Merchant Is Always a Stranger
97
Kung Fusion Organize the Hood Under IChing Banners
126
Notes
150
Acknowledgments
200
Credits
204
Index
205
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About the author (2002)

Vijay Prashad is director and associate professor of international studies at Trinity College and the author of The Karma of Brown Folk. He lives in Northampton, Massachusetts.

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