From Mr. Sin to Mr. Big: a history of Australian drug laws

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1993 - History - 262 pages
In this compelling legal and social history of the origins and development of drug laws in Australia, Desmond Manderson traces, in a lively and irreverent style, the gradual politicization of the drug law debate. He argues that the selective enactment of drug laws has been driven by fear, racism, powerful international pressures, and the vested interests of the medical profession, bureaucrats, and politicians, rather than by genuine concerns about the welfare of users. Behind the controversy that surrounds illegal drug use lie previously unexamined assumptions about how and why certain substances, such as opium, heroin, and cannibis, have been prohibited, while others, namely tobacco and alcohol, have not. Manderson boldly challenges these assumptions, while evaluating the power and efficacy of law as a means of achieving social change.

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Contents

A TENTACLE OF THE OCTOPUS
15
THE CRUSADES
37
BAD HABITS
59
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (1993)

Desmond Manderson is Senior Lecturer and Director of the Julius Stone Institute for Jurisprudence in the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney, Australia.