From the Soil, the Foundations of Chinese Society: A Translation of Fei Xiaotong's Xiangtu Zhongguo, with an Introduction and Epilogue

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1992 - History - 160 pages
This classic text by Fei Xiaotong, China's finest social scientist, was first published in 1947 and is Fei's chief theoretical statement about the distinctive characteristics of Chinese society. Written in Chinese from a Chinese point of view for a Chinese audience, From the Soil describes the contrasting organizational principles of Chinese and Western societies, thereby conveying the essential features of both. Fei shows how these unique features reflect and are reflected in the moral and ethical characters of people in these societies. This profound, challenging book is both succinct and accessible. In its first complete English-language edition, it is likely to have a wide impact on Western social theorists.
Gary G. Hamilton and Wang Zheng's translation captures Fei's jargonless, straightforward style of writing. Their introduction describes Fei's education and career as a sociologist, the fate of his writings on and off the Mainland, and the sociological significance of his analysis. The translators' epilogue highlights the social reforms for China that Fei drew from his analysis and advocated in a companion text written in the same period. This classic text by Fei Xiaotong, China's finest social scientist, was first published in 1947 and is Fei's chief theoretical statement about the distinctive characteristics of Chinese society. Written in Chinese from a Chinese point of view for a Chinese audience, From the Soil describes the contrasting organizational principles of Chinese and Western societies, thereby conveying the essential features of both. Fei shows how these unique features reflect and are reflected in the moral and ethical characters of people in these societies. This profound, challenging book is both succinct and accessible. In its first complete English-language edition, it is likely to have a wide impact on Western social theorists.
Gary G. Hamilton and Wang Zheng's translation captures Fei's jargonless, straightforward style of writing. Their introduction describes Fei's education and career as a sociologist, the fate of his writings on and off the Mainland, and the sociological significance of his analysis. The translators' epilogue highlights the social reforms for China that Fei drew from his analysis and advocated in a companion text written in the same period.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Fei Xiaotong and the Beginnings of a Chinese Sociology
1
1 Special Characteristics of Rural Society
37
2 Bringing Literacy to the Countryside
45
3 More Thoughts on Bringing Literacy to the Countryside
53
The Differential Mode of Association
60
5 The Morality of Personal Relationships
71
6 Patrilineages
80
7 Between Men and Women There Are Only Differences
87
10 An Inactive Government
108
11 Rule by Elders
114
12 Consanguinity and Regionalism
120
13 Separating Names from Reality
128
14 From Desire to Necessity
134
Sociology and the Reconstructionof Rural China
141
Glossary
153
Index
157

8 A Rule of Ritual
94
9 A Society without Litigation
101

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1992)

Gary G. Hamilton is Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington. Wang Zheng is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Davis.

Bibliographic information