Home Without a Homeland

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Diana Giese, 2011 - Australia - 425 pages
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Nora Huppert was flown out of Prague on the first Kindertransport, on the eve of World War II. This rescue mission, initiated and organised by Nicholas Winton, saved the lives of hundreds of children. In Home without a homeland, Huppert tells her own fascinating story and those of other survivors of those terrible times. Her father, an anti-Fascist journalist from a cultured German Jewish family, foresaw the rise of the Nazis and escaped to the safe haven of England, where both he and Huppert spent the War. Her mother, brother and other family members were not so fortunate. Loss, rescue, the web of connections and the idea of home for someone who has experienced five migrations, are the book's compelling themes. If Nora Huppert lost the country and culture of her birth, her message is that she could make new homes in places beyond Europe and Israel, in benign Australia which is friendly to Jewish people and other migrants. Home for her is a quality of being, about blending in and making a contribution wherever she finds herself living. Read this book to relive the experience of one child refugee and to gain an insider's view of Europe before the War and Britain and Australia afterwards.
 

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'Home Without a Homeland" is Nora Huppert's account of her life as a young Jewish German born less than five years before Hitler came to power. The kindertransport which saved Nora rescued around 700 children. She spent the war years in England, away from everything she knew, including the language.
Nora Huppert’s ‘Home Without a Homeland’ is one of over 40 titles in the Sydney Jewish Museum's community stories initiative. Dianne Armstrong define the program as "an invaluable archive of the social history of the community for future generations. Nora Huppert's account will undoubtedly prove to be one most worthy of this collection.
 

Contents

War closes
3
My English family
4
My father from Berlin Letters from Europe
5
Preface and Acknowledgements The memory lives on Untimely journeys
8
From high school to trade school Meanwhile in Prague
9
After the
10
From classroom to cutting room A fine romance London to Zurich
11
Our wedding
14
Interlude in Israel
18
Farewell England
19
Tasmania
20
Papa in Australia
21
The final migration
22
Spreading my wings
23
Journeys among the family
24
Peter and our daughters
25

My husband from Vienna
15
Separation
16
Move after move after move
17
Journeys to the past
26
Nicholas Wintons children Sources and references Family trees 1
27
Copyright

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