Kinds of Power: A Guide to Its Intelligent Uses

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Currency Doubleday, 1995 - Business & Economics - 260 pages
In the boldest expose on the nature of power since  Machiavelli, celebrated Jungian therapist James  Hillman shows how the artful leader uses each of two  dozen kinds of power with finesse and subtlety.  Power, we often forget, has many faces, many  different expressions. "Empowerment," writes  best-selling Jungian analyst James Hillman,  "comes from understanding the widest spectrum of  possibilities for embracing power." If food  means only meat and potatoes, your body suffers from  your ignorance. When your idea of food expands, so  does your strength. So it is with power.  "James Hillman," says Robert Bly, "is the  most lively and original psychologist we have had  in America since William James." In  Kinds Of Power, Hillman addresses  himself for the first time to a subject of great  interest to business people. He gives much needed  substance to the subject by showing us a broad  experience of power, rooted in the body, the rnind, and the  emotions, rather than the customary narrow  interpretation that simply equates power with strength.  Hillman's "anatomy" of power explores  two dozen expressions of power every artful leader  must understand and use, including: the language of  power, control, influence, resistance, leadership,  prestige, authority, exhibitionism, charisma,  ambition, reputation, fearsomeness, tyranny, purism,  subtle power, growth, and efficiency.

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KINDS OF POWER

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Jungian analyst Hillman (coauthor, Freud's Own Cookbook, 1985, etc.) rambles on about a new, and hopefully healthier, paradigm of power for the business world. Hillman believes that business offers ... Read full review

Contents

Opening the Book l
1
The Changing Heroics of Power
25
Introduction
27
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

James Hillman was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey on April 12, 1926. He attended the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University for two years before joining the Navy's Hospital Corps in 1944. He studied English literature in Paris at the Sorbonne and graduated with a degree in mental and moral science from Trinity College in Dublin. In 1953, he moved to Zurich and enrolled at the C. G. Jung Institute. In 1959, he became the director of studies at the institute and stayed in that position for the next 10 years. He wrote over 20 books including Suicide and the Soul, Re-Visioning Psychology, and The Soul's Code. He died due to complications of bone cancer on October 27, 2011 at the age of 85.

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