Losing Our Minds: Gifted Children Left Behind

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Great Potential Press, Inc., 2005 - Self-Help - 351 pages
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Wouldn't it be a disgrace if we lost the brightest students now attending our nation's schools? Dr. Deborah L. Ruf establishes that there are far more highly gifted children than previously imagined, yet large numbers of very bright children are "never discovered" by their schools. Using 78 gifted and highly gifted children as her examples, she illustrates five levels of giftedness. Parents will be able to estimate which of the five levels of giftedness their child fits by comparing their own child's developmental milestones to those of the children described in the book. This book contains practical advice for parents, including how to find a school that works for your child. Book jacket.
 

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Contents

One Familys Story
3
A Family Affair
4
Early School Years
7
Radical Adjustments
8
Taking Matters into Our Own Hands
9
Issues for Parents
11
Positive Feedback
12
Negative Feedback
13
Schedules and Transitions
206
Perfectionism
207
Issues with Authority
209
Demonstrations of Emotions and Feelings
211
Intensities and Sensitivities
212
Idealism Compassion and Sense of Fairness
214
Asynchrony of Development
216
Sense of Humor
217

Conflicting Feedback
14
How Parents Learn What to Do
15
Pressure from Others
19
Misdiagnoses of Medical and Behavioral Issues
20
Maintaining Modesty as Parents
21
Loneliness of the Parents
22
Summary of Parent Issues
23
Intellectual Level and Why it Matters
25
What Is Intelligence?
27
Who Are the Gifted and How Do We Find Them?
30
Giftedness According to Test Scores
32
Understanding the Confusion over IQ Scores
33
The Intelligence Continuum and Education
35
How Common Are Gifted Children?
36
The Assessment Process
37
Summary of Intellectual Assessment
48
Levels of Giftedness
49
Ruf Estimates of Levels of Giftedness
50
Early Indicators of Giftedness
52
Indicators of Uniquely High Ability
53
Who Are the Subjects of this Book?
54
Level One Gifted Approximately 90th to 98th Percentiles
57
The Children
58
Age Two to Three Years
60
Age Three to Four Years
61
Age Four to Five Years
62
Age Five to Six Years
63
Age Six to Seven Years
65
Age Seven to Nine Years
66
Age Nine and Older
68
Summary of Level One Gifted
69
Level Two Gifted Approximately 98th and 99th Percentiles
73
Age Two to Three Years
79
Age Three to Four Years
81
Age Four to Five Years
86
Age Five to Six Years
89
Age Six to Seven Years
91
Age Seven to Nine Years
93
Age Nine and Older
96
Level Three Gifted Approximately 98th and 99th Percentiles
101
The Children
102
Age Two to Three Years
106
Age Three to Four Years
108
Age Four to Five Years
113
Age Five to Six Years
115
Age Six to Seven Years
117
Age Seven to Nine Years
120
Age Nine and Older
121
Summary of Level Three Gifted
123
Level Four Gifted 99th Percentile
127
The Children
128
Birth to Two Years
129
Age Two to Three Years
134
Age Three to Four Years
139
Age Four to Five Years
143
Age Five to Six Years
146
Age Six to Seven Years
151
Age Seven to Nine Years
153
Age Nine and Older
155
Summary of Level Four Gifted
158
Level Five Gifted Above the 99th Percentile
163
The Children
165
Age Two to Three Years
171
Age Three to Four Years
174
Age Four to Five Years
178
Age Five to Six Years
181
Age Six to Seven Years
183
Age Seven to Nine Years
185
Age Nine and Older
187
Summary of Level Five Gifted
191
Gifted Children School Issues and Educational Options
197
What These Kids Are Like
199
High Demand for Attention in Infancy
200
Feisty Independent and StrongWilled
201
EasyGoing and Flexible
204
Concentration and Attention Span
205
General SociabilityHow They Spend their Time
218
Bossiness
222
Sportsmanship and Competitive Nature
223
Interests and Approach to Play
224
Performance and Leadership
227
Androgyny of Interests and Behaviors
228
Summary of Gifted Behaviors and Traits
229
The Crash Course on Giftedness and the Schools
231
Schools Are Problematic for Gifted Students
233
Age Grouping and the Demise of Ability Grouping
234
Societal Priorities and Funding
237
Teachers Are Not Trained to Recognize Individual Differences
239
Negative Effects of the Same Pace for Everyone
240
Social and Emotional Ramifications
242
The Way Gifted Children Are
243
Intellectual Differences
247
Personality Differences
248
Other Important Factors
249
School Years and Ongoing Issues
251
Social Adaptation Trumps Academic Abilities
253
Theyll Help My Child
256
Parents Assume that They Can Work with the Schools
258
Problems for the Gifted in School
261
Abilities Surpass Maturity
262
Teachers Overlook High Abilities
264
Behavior Problems
266
Poor Fit between Some Teachers and Gifted Children
268
Gifted Students Learn Poor Study Habits
269
Not Completing or Turning in Homework
270
Not Showing Enough Effort
272
Disorganization
273
Not Paying Attention in ClassBeing Distracted and Distractible
274
Confused SelfConcept
275
Depression
276
Loneliness and Feeling Different
277
Additional Problem Areas
279
Writing
281
Summary of School Issues
283
Educational Needs for Each Level
285
Types of Schools
286
Type III Schools
287
Early Entrance
288
Differentiated Instruction
289
WholeGrade Acceleration
290
FullTime Home Schooling
291
Radical Acceleration
292
Individualized Approach
293
Middle School Years
294
College Life and Career Planning
295
Social Life for Level One Children
296
Early Grade School Years
297
Middle School Years
298
High School Years
299
College Life and Career Planning
300
Social Life for Level Two Children
301
Early Grade School Years
302
Middle School Years
303
High School Years
304
Social Life for Level Three Children
305
Early Grade School Years
306
Middle School Years
307
College Life and Career Planning
308
Social Life for Level Four Children
309
Early Grade School Years
310
Middle School Years
311
High School Years
312
Social Life for Level Five Children
313
What Parents Can Do for Level Five Children
314
Developmental Guidelines for Identifying Gifted Preschoolers
317
Public School Curriculum Expectations by Grade Levels
319
Levels of Giftedness for Some Historical Figures
327
References
329
Endnotes
337
Index
347
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Deborah L. Ruf, Ph.D., author of Losing Our Minds: Gifted Children Left Behind (2005), works as a specialist in intelligence assessment and individualized interpretations and guidance for gifted children and adults. She lives in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area of Minnesota, where her research, writing, speaking, and practice focuses on school and educational issues and their related social and emotional adjustment for gifted children, particularly children at the highest levels of giftedness. Dr. Ruf founded Educational Options in 1998. Her familiarity with a diverse range of experiences enables her both to guide families through the educational system and to interpret where they actually “fit” (or don't fit) in these systems. She has worked in a variety of settings: elementary classroom teacher in Alexandria, Virginia; supervisor of elementary teachers for Moorhead State University in rural and small towns in North Dakota and Minnesota; Cass County Superintendent of Schools in North Dakota; part time home schooling and other educational alternatives for her own children; university class instructor in classroom management, school law, and gifted education; elementary school gifted education teacher in large district; principal intern in large school district; Boys and Girls Club tutor, and public speaker. Dr. Ruf's Ph.D., University of Minnesota, is in Educational Psychology with emphases in Test & Measurement and Learning & Cognition. Her Master's degree, University of Virginia, is in Administration and Supervision. One of her primary goals is to translate educational research into understandable and meaningful language for the general public, particularly families, so that they are empowered to work more effectively on behalf of their children within the educational systems. She wrote the High Ability Assessment Bulletin for the Stanford-Binet, Fifth Edition (2003) for Riverside Publishing, and it avoids the usual statistical jargon associated with assessment manuals. In 2003, Dr. Ruf accepted an ongoing volunteer appointment with American Mensa as the National Gifted Children Program Coordinator and is working to coordinate the efforts of numerous gifted advocacy groups while making Mensa a more welcoming organization to young people. A national level conference presenter, researcher on Levels of Giftedness and how intellectual profile affects adjustment, Dr. Ruf also consults with adult groups on the social and emotional intelligence of their members. For more information see http://www.educationaloptions.com/.

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