Losing Streak: How Tasmania Was Gamed By The Gambling Industry

Front Cover
Black Inc., Mar 14, 2017 - Political Science - 96 pages
0 Reviews
A jaw-dropping account of how one company came to own every poker machine in Tasmania – and the cost to democracy, the public purse and problem gamblers and their families.

The story begins with the toppling of a premier, and ends with David Walsh, the man behind MONA, taking an eccentric stand against pokie machines and the political status quo.

It is a story of broken politics and back-room deals. It shows how giving one company the licence to all the poker machines in the most disadvantaged state in the country has led to several hundred million dollars of profits (mainly from problem gamblers) being diverted from public use, through a series of questionable and poorly understood deals.

Losing Streak is a meticulous, compelling case study in governance failure, which has implications for pokies reform throughout Australia.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Winner and Losers
CHAPTER 12
CHAPTER 13
CHAPTER 14
CHAPTER 15
CHAPTER 10
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2017)

James Boyce is the author of Born Bad (2014), 1835 (2011) and Van Diemen's Land (2008). Van Diemen’s Land, won the Tasmania Book Prize and the Colin Roderick Award and was shortlisted for the NSW, Victorian and Queensland premiers’ literary awards, as well as the Prime Minister’s award. Tim Flannery described it as “a brilliant book and a must-read for anyone interested in how land shapes people.” 1835, won the Age Book of the Year Award and was shortlisted for the Prime Minister's Literary Award, the Western Australian Premier's Book Award, the Adelaide Festival Award for Literature and the Victorian Premier's Literary Award. The Sunday Age described it as “A first-class piece of historical writing”. James Boyce wrote the Tasmania chapter for First Australians, the companion book to the acclaimed SBS TV series. He has a PhD from the University of Tasmania, where he is an honorary research associate of the School of Geography and Environmental Studies.

Bibliographic information