Machiavelli, More & Luther

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2010 - Literary Collections - 404 pages
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Author name not noted above: Martin Luther and William Roper. Translator names not noted above: N.H. Thompson, Ralph Robinson, R.S. Grignon, and C.A. Buchheim. Originally published between 1909 and 1917 under the name "Harvard Classics," this stupendous 51-volume set-a collection of the greatest writings from literature, philosophy, history, and mythology-was assembled by American academic CHARLES WILLIAM ELIOT (1834-1926), Harvard University's longest-serving president. Also known as "Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf," it represented Eliot's belief that a basic liberal education could be gleaned by reading from an anthology of works that could fit on five feet of bookshelf. Volume XXXVI features essential works from 16th-century Europe: [ The Prince, the infamous 1513 collection of thoughts on politics and ethics by Italian diplomat and philosopher NICCOL MACHIAVELLI (1469-1527) [ Utopia, by English scholar SIR THOMAS MORE (1478-1535), a 1516 dissertation on the pressing social issues of his day [ The Life of Sir Thomas More, dating from the 1550s, by his son-in-law, English writer WILLIAM ROPER (c. 1498-1578) [ The Ninety-Five Theses, the 1517 criticism of the Church that started the Protestant Revolution by German theologian MARTIN LUTHER (1483-1546), plus his "Address to the Christian Nobility" and "Concerning Christian Liberty" English statesman and writer SIR THOMAS MORE (1478-1535) is best remembered as both a humanist scholar and a religious martyr: he was beheaded by King Henry VIII for refusing to acknowledge the monarch as the head of the Church of England.
 

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Contents

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About the author (2010)

Niccolo Machiavelli was born on May 3, 1469 in Florence, Italy. He was a political philosopher, statesman, and court advisor. Starting out as a clerk, he quickly rose in the ranks because he understood balance of power issues involved in many of his diplomatic missions. His political pursuits quickly ended after he was imprisoned by the Medici family. He is best known for The Prince, his guide to power attainment and cutthroat leadership. He also wrote poetry and plays, including a comedy named Mandragola. He died on June 21, 1527 at the age of 58.

Thomas Moore was born May 28, 1779, in Dublin. Moore entered Trinity College in 1794, even though he was Roman Catholic, on the college rolls he was listed as Protestant. Moore's friend and classmate Robert Emmet, was a member of the United Irishmen, a group dedicated to freeing Ireland from the English. Emmet's involvement in various rebellions and his subsequent execution, recur in Moore's work. Moore managed to stay in favor with the English, while writing in favour of Irish independence and produced some severely critical works about the treatment of the Irish peasants by their landlords. In 1799, Moore went to England to study law. He became a social success in London, due in part to his friendship with the earl of Moira. This led to the publication of the translated Odes of Anacreon, dedicated to the Prince of Wales. In 1803, Lord Moira's influence arranged a post for Moore in Bermuda, but he appointed a deputy soon after his arrival there, toured America and Canada, writing poetry all the way and returned to England to publish the work. Moore was a well-known singer, and his publisher suggested a book of Irish songs to the music of Sir John Stevenson. The Irish Ballads were a resounding success, and paid well for the next 25 years. Another successful field for Moore was political satire and his main target was his former patron, the Prince Regent. Moore became friends with Lord Byron and the two corresponded constantly. They played off of each other until Byron's death, where upon Moore became the executor of Byron's Memoirs. In 1835, Moore was granted a Civil List pension, which equaled 300 a year. He was also elected to the British Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1842, he received the Order of Merit from Frederick the Great of Prussia. Moore lapsed into senile dementia in in 1849 and died a few years later on February 25, 1852.

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