Multiple Competencies and Self-regulated Learning: Implications for Multicultural Education

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Chi-yue Chiu, Farideh Salili, Ying-yi Hong
IAP, 2001 - Education - 256 pages
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Examing multiple competencies and self-regulated learning in multicultural education, this volume covers topics including intelligence tests, knowledge assessment, mathematics in problem solving, and motivation and self-regulation.
 

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Contents

The Role of Multiple Competencies and Selfregulated Learning in Multicultural Education
3
Intelligence Tests as Measures of Developing Expertise
17
Authority and Learning in Confucianheritage Education A Relational Methodological Analysis
29
Implicit Concept Mapping Methodology and Applications in Knowledge Assessment
49
Analogical Problem Construction as an Indicator of Understanding in Mathematics Problem Solving
67
The Changing Model of Intellectual Abilities Effects on Schooling in Hong Kong
83
From Motivation to SelfRegulation Clustering Students Motivational and Cognitive Characteristics and Exploring the Impact of Social Interaction on ...
95
Motivation and Selfregulation a Crosscultural Comparison of the Effect of Culture and Context of Learning on Student Motivation and Selfregulation
123
Why Pursue a College Education? The Influence of Early Reflection and Goal Orientation on Adjustment During the First Semester
141
Motivational Change and Transition in the Translation from Primary School to Secondary School
163
Implicit Theories and Responses Achievement Setbacks
193
Relationship Between Academic Performance and Use of Selfregulated Learning Strategies among Form IV Students in Zimbabwe
205
An Investigative Research in Teaching and Learning in Chinese Societies
215
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Page 18 - Conventional tests of intelligence and related abilities measure achievement that individuals should have accomplished several years back. Tests such as vocabulary, reading, comprehension, verbal analogies, arithmetic problem solving, and the like are all, in part, tests of achievement. Even abstract-reasoning tests measure achievement in dealing with geometric symbols, skills taught in Western schools (Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition, 1982). One might as well use academic performance to...
Page 18 - Tests such as vocabulary, reading comprehension, verbal analogies, arithmetic problem solving, and the like, are all, in part, tests of achievement. Even abstract-reasoning tests measure achievement in dealing with geometric symbols, skills taught in Western schools (Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition 1982). One might as well use academic performance to predict ability-test scores. The problem regarding the traditional model is not in its statement of a correlation between ability tests and...
Page 8 - The idea behind Success for All is to use everything we know about effective instruction for students at risk to direct all aspects of school and classroom organization toward the goal of preventing academic deficits from appearing in the first place, recognizing and intensively intervening with any deficits that do appear, and providing students with a rich and full curriculum to enable them to build on their firm foundation in basic skills. The commitment of Success for All is to do whatever it...
Page 18 - According to this view, although ability tests may have temporal priority relative to various criteria in their administration (ie, ability tests are administered first, and later, criterion indices of performance, such as grades or achievement test scores, are collected), they have no psychological priority. All of the various kinds of assessments are of the same kind psychologically. What distinguishes ability tests from other kinds of assessments is how the ability tests are used (usually predictively)...

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