Narrative of a Voyage to New South Wales, and Van Dieman's Land: In the Ship Skelton, During the Year 1820; with Observations on the State of These Colonies, and a Variety of Information, Calculated to be Useful to Emigrants ...

Front Cover
John Anderson, 1822 - Australia - 148 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 134 - ... cultivation. His Excellency was also happy to observe, that by the introduction of the Merino breed of sheep, (some of which have been lately imported direct from England, and still many more...
Page 126 - His Excellency felt agreeably surprised at beholding the very considerable progress lately made in the erection of the more immediately requisite public buildings at this new station, much of which progress may be attributed to the personal superintendance of the Commandant, whose head quarters had been with that view removed thither from Launceston in May 1819.
Page 124 - Cove one of the best and safest anchorages in the world. 3. The industry and spirit of enterprize, exhibited generally by the inhabitants of Hobart Town, bespeak a favourable opinion of their manners, and the numerous comforts enjoyed by them, as the result of their application, mark the certain reward which will ever be attendant on persevering industry ; whilst the prevailing desire for the improvement of the town bids fair to render it one of the handsomest and most flourishing in Australia.
Page 134 - Sorell, who appears to be indefatigable in projecting, and carrying into effect, all those measures, which, by being persevered in, must raise Van Diemen's Land, at no very distant day, to the proud distinction of being one of the most valuable colonies belonging to the Crown. The recent influx of several respectable free settlers, with considerable property, will not fail, under the auspices of Lieutenant-Governor Sorell, to hasten that period at which Van Diemen's Land will hold a high rank among...
Page 125 - CHRONICLE. 193 to refer much of the prevailing spirit of industry to the wise regulations and judicious arrangements of his honour, Lieutenant -Governor Sorell, under whose administration, during the short period of little more than four years, all the principal public buildings, and the greater part of the private ones, have been erected ; and the various other improvements have flowed from the same source. Beholding these rapid, extensive, and ornamental improvements of Hobart Town, the governor...
Page 123 - ... wretched huts and cottages, of which it then consisted, being now converted into regular substantial buildings, and the whole laid out in regular streets; several of the houses being two stories high, spacious, and not deficient in architectural taste. The principal public buildings which hare been erected, are a Government House, a handsome church, a commodious military barrack, a strong jail, a well constructed hospital, and a roomy barrack for convicts, which latter is now nearly completed.
Page 122 - At an early hour, on the next morning, the ihip got clear of the heads of Port Jackson, and had proceeded some way to the southward, when the wind became contrary, and blew so strong, that she was obliged to return in the evening of the 6th to Port Jackson. Early on the 13th the ship got again under weigh, and arrived at Hobart Town, on the river Derwent, in Van Diemen's Land, on the morning of Tuesday, the 24th, after a voyage of eleven days. His Excellency's arrival being expected, his landing...
Page 128 - George Town is not only beautiful, but also admirably adapted for all the purposes of trade, being situated on the banks of a river navigable for ships of large burden, and but a short way removed from the sea in Bass's Straits ; and has the advantage of a plentiful supply of fresh water from springs in its immediate neighbourhood.
Page 123 - It was with much satisfaction that his Excellency beheld the numerous changes and improvements which Hobart Town had undergone since the period of his former visit, in 1811 ; the wretched huts and cottages, of which it then consisted, being now converted into regular substantial buildings, and the whole laid out in regular streets ; several of the houses being two stories high, spacious, and not deficient in architectural taste. The principal public buildings which...
Page 151 - D'Arblay, had they continued her history, might have heightened the portrait, but they would not have altered its outline. Like the poetry of Tasso and Ariosto, that of the Gentle Shepherd is engraven on the memory, and has sunk into the heart, of its native country.

Bibliographic information