One Continuous Picnic: A Gastronomic History of Australia

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Melbourne Univ. Publishing, 2007 - History - 366 pages
Australians first confronted the oddities of their national cuisine when this gastronomic classic appeared 25 years ago.ĉBecauseĉAustralia never had a peasant farming classĉwith local cooking customs, the book explains, camp foodĉbecame the mainstay of theĉAussieĉdining tradition. Portable weekly rations of mutton, flour, and teaĉhad turned the early settlers into a mobile army, and their suburbanite descendants still survive on tins of jam, condensed milk, camp pie, and beer.ĉA cry for action, the book successfully launched a newĉAustralianĉtaste forĉfresh produce, farm markets, and international flavors more than two decades one that still exists today.
 

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Contents

The uncultivated continent
1
HISTORY WITHOUT PEASANTS
11
Meat three times a day
28
The Aristologist
46
THE COMING OF THE QUICHE
249
Hard tomatoes for hard times
283
The art of eating in Australia
298
THE WIDENING GAP
309
Free the market
315
Notes on sources
341
Index
353
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Michael Symons is a former journalist for the "Sydney Morning Herald" and the author of "The Pudding that Took a Thousand Cooks" and "A Shared Table."

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