Peripheral Centres, Central Peripheries: India and Its Diaspora(s)

Front Cover
Martina Ghosh-Schellhorn, Vera Alexander
LIT Verlag Münster, 2006 - History - 294 pages

Prominent scholars in literary and cultural studies, anthropology, sociology, linguistics, media studies, theater production, and translation challenge the center-periphery dichotomy used as a paradigm for relations between colonizers and their erstwhile subjects in this collection of critical interventions.

Focussing on India and its diaspora(s) in western industrialized nations and former British colonies, this volume engages with topics of centrality and/or peripherality, particularly in the context of Anglophone Indian writing, the Indian languages, Indian film as art and popular culture, cross-cultural Shakespeare, diasporic pedagogy, and transcultural identity.

Martina Ghosh-Schellhorn is professor of new English-speaking cultures at the University of Saarland, (Germany).

 

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Contents

A Preface to Peripheral Centres Central Peripheries
1
CORE CONCEPTUALISATIONS
12
Anglophone India and its Diasporas
13
Whose Centre Which Periphery?
37
The Southern Intellectual
47
The Evolution of the CentrePeriphery Concept
75
A Voice from the Periphery
81
RECONTEXTUALIZING CENTRALITY
90
A Working Paper on Aspects of the Politics of the PostColonial
173
The Child and the Nation in Contemporary South Asian Literature
183
InterCultural Tempests India Mauritius and London
195
Looking at the Centre with Furious Eyes
205
Satyajit Ray and Cinematic Modernism
213
Lagaan and the Hindi Film after the 1990s
223
PERIPHERAL POLYPHONY
242
Issues of Identity among Indians at Home and in the Diaspora
243

Reversing a Discursive Hierarchy
91
Indian Anglophony Diasporan Polycentricism and Postcolonial Futures
101
Diaspora Hybridity Pedagogy
113
Traumatic Memory Mourning and VS Naipaul
129
An Indian Contribution to World Literature
157
PARAMETERS OF THE LOCAL AND THE GLOBAL
172
Voices from the Periphery
251
Indian Subjects in the New South Africa
263
Indian Translations Move from the Periphery to the Centre
281
CONTRIBUTORS
285
INDEX
291
Copyright

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Page 20 - We must at present do our best to form a class who may be interpreters between us and the millions whom we govern; a class of persons, Indian in blood and colour, but English in taste, in opinions, in morals, and in intellect.
Page 19 - Globalization can thus be defined as the intensification of worldwide social relations which link distant localities in such a way that local happenings are shaped by events occurring many miles away and vice versa.
Page 16 - The one is independent, and its essential nature is to be for itself; the other is dependent, and its essence is life or existence for another. The former is the Master, or Lord, the latter the Bondsman.

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