Positive Development: From Vicious Circles to Virtuous Cycles Through Built Environment Design

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Earthscan, 2008 - Architecture - 408 pages
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Janis Birkeland presents the innovative new paradigm of 'Positive Development' in which the built environment provides greater life quality, health, amenity and safety for all without sacrificing resources or money. With a different form of design, development itself can become a 'sustainability solution'. A cornerstone of this new paradigm is the eco-retrofitting of the vast urban fabric we already inhabit. The author presents a revolutionary new tool called SmartMode to achieve this end. This book challenges everyone working in or studying the areas of sustainable development, planning, architecture or the built environment to rethink their current ideas and practices.
 

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Contents

The Case for Ecoretrofitting
23
Sustainable Urban Form
43
Critique of MethodsTools and Processes in Building Design
61
Building Rating Tools
83
Design Methods
97
Critique of Methods Tools and Processes in Environmental Management
115
Regional Sustainability Audits
131
Sustainability Reporting
147
Digital modelling for sustainability Robin Drogemuller and John Frazer
307
Typology of green aesthetic orientations
309
Solar design mythconceptions
310
Contextual design the case of plastic
311
Spectrum of design approaches
312
Green building and product procurement David Baggs
313
Tools for specifying green building products David Baggs
314
Evolution toward Positive Development
315

Critique of Trends in Strategies Incentives and Planning
163
Ecoservice Trading Schemes
181
Bioregional Planning
201
A framework for Ecogovernance and Management
217
Constitution for Ecogovernance From interest balancing to ethical frameworks
219
Reversing Resource Transfers From pyramidal to positive resource distribution
235
The SmartMode Process From technocratic to integrated planning and design
251
Boxes
275
Net Positive Development
277
Ecological design defined
278
Examples of net Positive Development
279
Green Scaffolding versus double skins
281
Green Scaffolding retrofit
282
Deconstruction Neil Seldman
283
Excuses for not retrofitting
284
Retrofitting the suburbs
285
Solar Core
286
Linearreductionist urban analysis
287
Urban density compactness and urban form Greg Bamford
288
The social dimension of urban consolidation Patrick Nicol Troy
289
Water and sewage management Sarah West
290
Advantages of ecoroofs Linda S Velazquez
292
Net Positive physical Development criteria
294
Making positive impacts Sonia Sales Mendoza
295
Urban wind energy
296
Solar powering the future Keith Lovegrove
299
Ewaste Robin TennantWood
300
Designing for successful failure Paul Bannister
301
The case of the steelframe housing
302
Green building guidelines
303
Potential of flows analyses
316
Tools for capturing regional synergies Glen Corder
317
Enhancing supply chain performance Kumar Venkat
318
Making progress Richard Eckersley
319
From SoE to sustainability reporting for cities Peter W Newton
320
Certification and labelling Tim Cadman
321
Ethical investment Konrad Knerr
322
Engaging the public in sustainability planning Dave Biggs
323
Closing loops between sectors
324
Linking policies to outcomes Ian Swain
325
Ecoservice offsets versus credits
327
Economic valuation of ecoservices
329
Problems with pricing ecoservices
331
Measuring living wall performance Yael Stav
332
Decision trees Terminal and reversible
333
Community management of ecosystems David Eastburn
334
Wagga Wagga Ecoindustrial Park Sharon Stacy
335
Equity Mapping James Byrne
336
Conventional approach to regulation
337
Organic waste to farms Gerry Gillespie
338
Precycling insurance James Greyson
339
Negative resource transfers
340
Converting negatives into positives
341
Reversing the role of fashion Fabia Pryor
342
Glossary
343
Notes
351
Biographies of contributors
387
Index
393
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About the author (2008)

Janis Birkeland worked consecutively as artist, advocacy planner, architect, urban designer, city planner and attorney in San Francisco before entering academia in Australia. She has authored over 100 publications on built environment and sustainability and wrote the highly successful and widely adopted Design for Sustainability (Earthscan, 2002). She is now Professor of Architecture at Queensland University of Technology, Australia.

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