Re-imagining Political Community: Studies in Cosmopolitan Democracy

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Stanford University Press, 1998 - Political Science - 352 pages
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This book sets out to explore the changing meaning of political community in a world of regional and global social and economic relations. From a variety of academic backgrounds, its authors reconsider some of the key terms of political association, such as legitimacy, sovereignty, identity and citizenship. The common approach of the authors is to generate an innovative account of what democracy means today and how it can be reconceptualized to include subnational as well as transnational levels of political organization. Inspired by Immanuel Kant's cosmopolitan principles, the authors conclude that there are favourable conditions for a further development of democracy - locally, nationally, regionally and globally. Re-imagining Political Community will be welcomed by students of politics, political theory, international relations and peace studies, as well as by those working in international organizations and engaged in transnational activities.
 

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Contents

Democracy and Globalization
11
Governance and Democracy in a Globalizing World
28
Human Rights as a Model for Cosmopolitan Democracy
58
an Essay in International
72
Reconceptualizing Organized Violence
91
Citizenship and Sovereignty in the PostWestphalian
113
Transnational Democracy?
138
Rights and Democracy within the European Union
152
Janna Thompson
179
Principles of Cosmopolitan Democracy
198
From the National to the Cosmopolitan Public Sphere
231
Global Security Problems and the Challenge to Democratic
252
a Special Case for Cosmopolitan Citizenship?
273
Index
332
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About the author (1998)

Daniele Archibugi is Researcher at the Italian National Research Council, Rome. David Held is Professor of Politics and Sociology at the Open University. Martin Kohler is Researcher at the Center for Peace Research, Madrid."

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