Recognizing Reality: Dharmakirti's Philosophy and Its Tibetan Interpretations

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Dreyfus examines the central ideas of Dharmakirti, one of the most important Indian Buddhist philosophers, and their reception among Tibetan thinkers. During the golden age of ancient Indian civilization, Dharmakirti articulated and defended Buddhist philosophical principles. He did so more systematically than anyone before his time (the seventh century CE) and was followed by a rich tradition of profound thinkers in India and Tibet. This work presents a detailed picture of this Buddhist tradition and its relevance to the history of human ideas. Its perspective is mostly philosophical, but it also uses historical considerations as they relate to the evolution of ideas.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
12
Dharmakirtis Tradition in India and Tibet
15
CHAPTER
20
The Epistemological Turn in Indian Philosophy The Place
33
BOOK ONE ONTOLOGY AND PHEOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE
47
Method Epistemology and Ontological Commitments Indian
56
CHAPTER 4
59
Dharrnakirtis System Dharmakirti on Momentariness Causal
71
Are Negation and Elimination Equivalent? Objective Elimination
250
Notion of Object Universal in the Tibetan Tradition Object
257
VALID COGNITION
285
Terminology and the MindBody Problem Knowledge and Pramarza
296
Object An Intentional Interpretation The Requirement of Novelty
310
Can Inference Be Valid? Dharmakirti on the Validity of
316
PERCEPTION
331
Dharmakirtis Account of Perception The Nyaya Theory of
345

The Purview of the Real Atomic Theory An Alternate
83
Interpretation N0 Extended Object Can Be Real Some Extended
103
and Universals Geluk Realism and Commonsense Objects Realism
116
THE PROBLEM OF UNIVERSALS
127
Nominalism Extreme and Moderate Realisms and Their
134
Predicaments Realism in India Moderate Realism in Indian
140
Arguments Against Realism The Roles of Universals Universals
151
Refutation of Realism Sakya Chokden on Predication Predication
168
Many Arguments for Moderate Realism Subject and Predicate
187
Introduction to Apoha The History of Apoha and its Reception
205
Dharmakirti on Concept Formation Thought and Language
217
TWO Definitions of Thought The Negative Nature of Conceptuality
230
Dharmottara as a Commentator and an Innovator The Validity
359
Perception Geluk Views of Perception Implicit and Explicit
373
Sapans Critique of the New Epistemology Sapans Rejection
389
CHAPTER 26
416
Dharmakirtis Thought True or False Aspect? Sakya Chokden
438
Philosophy as an Education of the Mind Realism
443
and Antirealism as Interpretations Philosophy as an Education
460
Tibetan Sanskrit English
563
Bibliography
581
Author Index
603
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About the author

Georges B. J. Dreyfus is Assistant Professor of Religion at Williams College. He studied Buddhist philosophy in Tibetan monasteries in India for fifteen years where he completed the degree of Ge-shay, traditionally the highest degree awarded by Tibetan Buddhist monastic universities.

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