Sexuality & Space

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Princeton Architectural Press, 1992 - Architecture - 389 pages
3 Reviews
Sexuality & Space's interdisciplinary essays address gender in relation to architectural discourse and critical theory, focusing on the relationships between sexuality and space hidden within everyday practices. Contributors include Jennifer Bloomer, Victor Burgin, Beatriz Colomina, Elizabeth Grosz, Catherine Ingraham, Meaghan Morris, Laura Mulvey, Molly Nesbit, Alessandra Ponte, Lynn Spigel, Patricia White, and Mark Wigley.

"A milestone in the evolving discourse of architectural history and criticism.... These essays raise crucial questions about design and the experience of architecture, and many attempt to engage ... the rich critical literature of cultural studies". -- Alice T. Friedman, JSAH

"Sexuality and Space is important, even necessary.... Both timely and well worth the time". -- Thomas Keenan, Newsline

 

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This is not an edited volume but instead presents the proceedings from a 1990 Princeton University conference by the same name. In Sexuality & Space, analyses of sexuality are folded into other, interdisciplinary concerns (of Adolf Loos and the “metropolitan individual,” of Le Corbusier and the camera; of Alberti and the “closet,” or of Semper and 19th century art history, et cetera), and are therefore sublimated into other scholastic inquiries (namely: critical theory and historiography). To this end, the void between feminist studies and architectural theory identified as the subject and ostensibly alleviated antecedent to the symposium Sexuality & Space, by Beatriz Colomina, in the proceedings introduction, is precisely that which is asserted by the volume's attendant essays. Taking some liberties with Colomina’s introduction: to the extent that “feminist theorists… conspicuously ignored in architectural discourse and practice” are addressed by Sexuality & Space, the “interdisciplinary exchange in which theories of sexuality are reread in architectural terms and architecture is reread in sexual terms” by its essays does little more than to reassert the very silence that its attendant inquiry ostensibly alleviated. 

Contents

Meaghan Morris
1
Laura Mulvey
53
Beatriz Colomina
73
Patricia White
131
Jennifer Bloomer
163
Lynn Spigel
185
Elizabeth Grosz
241
Catherine Ingraham
255
Alessandra Ponte
273
Molly Nesbit
307
Mark Wigley
327
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