Shoeless: The Life and Times of Joe Jackson

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McFarland, Mar 12, 2001 - Sports & Recreation - 320 pages
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"Shoeless" Joe Jackson was one of baseball's greatest hitters and most colorful players. Born Joseph Jefferson Wofford Jackson on July 16, 1888, in Pickens County, South Carolina, Jackson went to work in a textile mill when he was around six years old, and got his start in baseball playing for the Brandon Mill team at the age of 13 earning $2.50 a game. He emerged as the star of the team and a favorite of fans with his hitting and throwing abilities, and moved up to play in the Carolina Association, where he received his nickname "Shoeless" because the blisters on his feet forced him to play in his stockings. He then made his move to the major leagues, signing on with the Philadelphia Athletics and rising to fame. This work chronicles Jackson's life from his poor beginnings to his involvement in the scandal surrounding the 1919 World Series to his life after baseball and his death December 5, 1951, with most of the work focusing on his baseball career.
 

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Shoeless: the life and times of Joe Jackson

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Whether you see him as a knowing co-conspirator with his "Black Sox" teammates or as an innocent rube tragically swept along in the plot to throw the 1919 World Series, "Shoeless Joe" Jackson was ... Read full review

Contents

The Kid from Brandon Mill
5
From Philadelphia to Savannah
21
Joe Arrives in Cleveland
33
408
46
Baseballs Newest Star
60
The Greatest Natural Hitter
71
Last Place
81
Turmoil and a Trade
96
What the Hell Is Coming Off Here?
178
The Winter of 191920
195
The Most Difficult Season
206
The Grand Jury
219
The Trial
234
Regardless of the Verdict of Juries
248
I Gave Baseball All I Had
259
Epilogue
273

A New Beginning
113
The 1917 Season
124
World Champions
136
War and Controversy
147
The Fateful Season
162
Chapter Notes
289
Bibliography
305
Index
309
Copyright

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Page 2 - I loved the game," Shoeless Joe went on. "I'd have played for food money. I'd have played free and worked for food. It was the game, the parks, the smells, the sounds. Have you ever held a bat or a baseball to your face? The varnish, the leather. And it was the crowd, the excitement of them rising as one when the ball was hit deep. The sound was like a chorus. Then there was the chug-a-lug of the tin lizzies in the parking lots, and the hotels with their brass spittoons in the lobbies and brass beds...

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About the author (2001)

David L. Fleitz, author of eight books on baseball history, is a member of the Society for American Baseball Research. A computer systems analyst, he lives in Pleasant Ridge, Michigan.

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