Spreading Germs: Disease Theories and Medical Practice in Britain, 1865-1900

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 16, 2000 - History - 327 pages
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Spreading Germs discusses how modern ideas on the nature and causes of infectious diseases were constructed and spread within the British medical profession during the last third of the nineteenth century. Michael Worboys challenges many existing interpretations, arguing that at various times there were many germ theories that developed in different ways and did not always embrace science and the use of laboratories. It was the discipline of bacteriology that institutionalized the various new ideas and practices during the 1880s, and in a way that was more evolutionary than revolutionary.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Medical Practice and Disease Theories c 1865
20
Veterinary Medicine the Cattle Plague and Contagion 18651890
43
Germs in the Air Surgeons Hospitalism and Sepsis 18651876
73
Sanitary Science Poisons and Contagium Viva 18661880
108
Deeper Than the Surface of the Wound Surgeons Antisepsis and Asepsis 18761900
150
From Heredity to Infection Tuberculosis Bacteriology and Medicine 18701900
193
Preventive Medicine and the Bacteriological Era
232
Conclusion
275
Select Bibliography
291
Index
315
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Page 304 - ESSAYS ON THE FLOATING MATTER OF THE AIR IN RELATION TO PUTREFACTION AND INFECTION.

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