Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain

Front Cover
Mountaineers Books, 2018 - Sports & Recreation - 352 pages
The more you know about snow stability, the better your travel and rescue skills. And the sharper your decision making, the better you'll be able to avoid avalanche danger and have more fun in the winter backcountry. In Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain, 3rd Edition, acclaimed snow and avalanche expert Bruce Tremper provides easy-to-understand avalanche safety tips and skills, including the latest snow research and techniques for evaluating snowpack, as well how to rescue companions in the event of an avalanche. Other topics include:
  • How to evaluate terrain and decide whether it's safe or dangerous
  • How avalanches work
  • How to test snow stability
  • How to control your exposure and lower your risk
  • Safe travel techniques
  • What to do if you're caught in an avalanche
  • Search-and-rescue strategies
  • Managing the human factors that contribute to accidents
This fully revised and updated third edition of Bruce's best-selling book is organized according to the structure of American Avalanche Association classes, and all topics have been updated and reviewed by peer experts. This edition also features a wholly new chapter in which Bruce pulls all the pieces together to create an organized, step-by-step system for making decisions off, and on, the mountain.
As Rocky Mountain News proclaimed, "No one who plays in the mountain snow should leave home without having studied this book." Clear, comprehensive, and engaging, Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain shares everything skiers, snowboarders, and other backcountry travelers need to know to stay safe in the mountains.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2018)

Bruce Tremper grew up skiing in the mountains of western Montana, where his father taught him the basics of avalanches at the age of ten. He was a member of the Junior National Ski Team and the US Ski Team Talent Squad; in 1973, he was NCAA Division Downhill Champion. Bruce's professional avalanche experience began in 1977 when he did avalanche control for Bridger Bowl Ski Area. He later was director of avalanche control at Big Sky Ski Area, an avalanche forecaster for the Alaska Avalanche Center, and director of the Forest Service Utah Avalanche Center where he worked for almost thirty years.

Bibliographic information