The Death of William Gooch: A History's Anthropology

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Melbourne University Publish, 1995 - History - 191 pages

William Gooch died at Waimea on the island of Oahu in the Hawaiian chain. Pahupu, Hawaiian warriors 'cut-in-two' by their tattoos, killed him there. He was only twenty-two. Gooch's is a short life indeed on which to base a book. But Greg Dening uses the incident of his murder as the basis for a penetrating study of historical narrative and meaning. Gooch, the young astronomer on board the Daedalus, is written into history through the perceptions and intentions of the historian. This is 'history's anthropology'. The layers of interpretation and meaning are woven into the fabric of the history itself. And this is the historian entwined in the fragments of the past that are sought, found, reworked and retold.

 

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About the author (1995)

Greg Dening isæemeritus professor of history at the University of Melbourne, and is the prize-winning author of Mr Bligh's Bad Language.

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