The Decameron, Volume 2

Front Cover
Gibbings & Company, 1898
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Contents

I
1
II
28
III
50
IV
69
V
74
VI
86
VII
95
VIII
111
XIV
198
XV
215
XVI
226
XVII
242
XVIII
259
XIX
271
XX
280
XXI
287

IX
121
X
128
XI
142
XII
166
XIII
182
XXII
299
XXIII
306
XXIV
316
XXV
322

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Page 283 - Isabel, thou grievest incessantly for my absence, and art continually calling upon me; but know that I can return no more to thee, for the last day that thou sawest me, thy brothers put me to death.
Page 234 - I have done, or to entreat any favour of you, is no part of my design at present; for as the one can avail me nothing, so I intend the other shall be of little service. I will take no advantage of your love and tenderness towards me; but shall first, by an open confession, endeavour to vindicate myself, and then do what the greatness of my soul prompts me to. 'Tis most true that I have loved, and do still love, Guiscard: and...
Page 281 - This affair was carried on between them for a considerable time, without the least suspicion ; till one night it happened, as Isabella was going to Lorenzo's chamber, that the eldest brother saw her, without her knowing it. This afflicted him greatly ; yet, being a prudent man, he made no discovery, but lay considering with himself till morning, what course was best to take. He then related to his brothers what he had seen, with regard to their sister and Lorenzo, and, after a long debate, it was...
Page 73 - All round and through the midst of it were broad straight walks flanked with vines, which seemed to promise a plenteous vintage; and being all in blossom, they gave so delicious a scent, joined with other flowers then blowing in the garden, that they thought themselves amongst the spiceries of the east. The sides of these walks were closed with white and red roses and jessamine, in such a manner as to exclude the morning and even the mid-day sun.
Page 228 - Affecting each other thus in secret, and she desiring nothing so much as to be with him, and not daring to trust any person with the affair, contrived a new stratagem in order to apprise him of the means. She wrote a letter, wherein she mentioned what she would have him do the next day for her ; this she put into a hollow cane, and giving it to him one day, she said, pleasantly, " You may make a pair of bellows of this, for your servant to blow the fire with this evening.
Page 235 - ... those of greater merit. We are all formed of the same materials, and by the same hand. The first difference amongst mankind was made by virtue ; they who were virtuous were deemed noble, and the rest were all accounted otherwise.
Page 232 - ... that they might be private together, he said to her, weeping, " Daughter, I had such an opinion of your modesty and virtue, that I could never have believed, had I not seen it with my own eyes, that you would have violated either, even so much as in thought.
Page 232 - Guiscard, he is one of the very meanest persons about my court. This gives me such concern, that I scarcely know what to do. As for him, he was secured by my order last night, and his fate is determined. But, with regard to yourself, I am influenced by two different motives ; on one side, the tenderest regard that a father can have for a child ; and on the other, the justest vengeance for the great folly you have committed. One pleads strongly in your behalf; and the other would excite me to do an...
Page 236 - I must apprise you of, that unless you do the same to me, which you either have done, or mean to do to Guiscard, my own hands shall do it for you. Leave tears then to women ; and if you mean to act with severity, cut us off both together, if it appear to you that we have deserved it.
Page 283 - Accordingly, having leave to go a little way into the country along with a companion of hers who was acquainted with all her affairs, she went thither, and clearing the ground of the dried leaves with which it was covered, she observed where the earth seemed to be lightest, and dug there. She had not searched far before she came to her lover's body, which she found in no degree wasted. This...

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