The First New Nation: The United States in Historical and Comparative Perspective

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers, 1967 - History - 366 pages

The United States was the first major colony to revolt successfully against colonial rule. In this sense, it was the first "new nation." To see how, in the course of American history, its values took shape in institutions may help us to understand some of the problems faced by the new nations emerging today on the world scene. In The First New Nation, two broad themes occupy Seymour Martin Lipset's attention: the social conditions that make a stable democracy possible, and the extent to which the American experience was representative or exceptional.

The volume is divided into three parts, each of which deals with the role of values in a nation's evolution, but each approaches this role from a different perspective. Part 1, "America as a New Nation," compares early America with today's emerging nations to discover problems common to them as new nations, and analyzes some of the consequences of a revolutionary birth for the creation of a national character and style. Part 2, "Stability in the Midst of Change," traces how values derived from America's revolutionary origins have continued to influence the form and substance of American institutions.

Lipset concentrates on American history in later periods, selecting for discussion as critical cases religious institutions and trade unions. Part 3, "Democracy in Comparative Perspective," attempts to show by comparative analysis some ways through which a nation's values determine its political evolution. It compares political development in several modern industrialized democracies, including the United States, touching upon value patterns, value differences, party systems, and the bases of social cleavage.

 

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Contents

I
vi
II
xlii
III
2
IV
16
V
17
VI
24
VII
37
VIII
46
XXVIII
197
XXIX
200
XXX
204
XXXI
208
XXXII
210
XXXIII
214
XXXIV
225
XXXV
240

IX
62
X
63
XI
67
XII
75
XIII
91
XIV
102
XV
107
XVI
111
XVII
123
XVIII
130
XIX
141
XXI
142
XXII
152
XXIII
160
XXIV
171
XXV
174
XXVI
179
XXVII
188
XXXVI
249
XXXIX
269
XL
275
XLII
278
XLIII
282
XLIV
287
XLV
290
XLVI
294
XLVII
296
XLVIII
308
XLIX
313
L
319
LI
322
LII
341
LIII
344
LIV
350
LV
357
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