The Formation Of A Persecuting Society: Power And Deviance In Western Europe, 950-1250

Front Cover
Wiley, 1990 - History - 168 pages
The Tenth to the Thirteenth centuries in Europe saw the appearance of popular heresy and the establishment of the inquisition; expropriation and mass murder of Jews; the foundation of leper hospitals in large numbers and the propagation of elaborate measures to segregate lepers from the healthy. These have traditionally been seen as distinct and separate developments, and explained in terms of the problems which their victims presented to medieval society. In this stimulating book Robert Moore argues that the coincidences in the treatment of these and other minority groups cannot be explained independently, and that all are part of a pattern of persecution which now appeared for the first time to make Europe become, as it has remained, a persecuting society.

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User Review  - jonfaith - LibraryThing

It is the argument of this that however the tremendous extension of the power and influence of the literate is described, the development of persecution in all its forms was part of it, and therefore ... Read full review

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User Review  - thcson - LibraryThing

This is an interesting book which speculates on the reasons behind increased persecution of Jews, heretics, lepers, homosexuals and others in 11th-12th century Europe. The author wants to refute the ... Read full review

About the author (1990)

R. I. Moore has been Professor of Medieval History at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne since 1993. He previously taught at Sheffield University, and as a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago. His previous books include The Birth of Popular Heresy (1975), The Origins of European Dissent (1977) and The Formation of a Persecuting Society: Power and Deviance in Western Europe, 950-1250 (1987). He is also General Editor of the Blackwell History of the World series.

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