The House of the Mosque

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Canongate Books, Jan 21, 2010 - Fiction - 448 pages
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In the house of the mosque, the family of Aqa Jaan has lived for eight centuries. Now it is occupied by three cousins: Aqa Jaan, a merchant and head of the city's bazaar; Alsaberi, the imam of the mosque and Aqa Shoja, the mosque's muezzin. The house itself teems with life, as each of their families grows up with their own triumphs and tragedies. Sadiq is waiting for a suitor to knock at the door to ask for her hand, while her two grandmothers sweep the floors each morning dreaming of travelling to Mecca. Meanwhile Shahbal longs only to get hold of a television to watch the first moon landing. All these daily dramas are played out under the watchful eyes of the storks that nest on the minarets above. But this family will experience upheaval unknown to previous generations. For in Iran, political unrest is brewing. The shah is losing his hold on power; the ayatollah incites rebellion from his exile in France; and one day the ayatollah returns. The consequences will be felt in every corner of Aqa Jaan's family.
 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
6
Section 3
19
Section 4
29
Section 5
46
Section 6
56
Section 7
63
Section 8
71
Section 23
242
Section 24
250
Section 25
255
Section 26
263
Section 27
275
Section 28
284
Section 29
295
Section 30
307

Section 9
86
Section 10
96
Section 11
123
Section 12
130
Section 13
138
Section 14
150
Section 15
161
Section 16
170
Section 17
181
Section 18
187
Section 19
198
Section 20
204
Section 21
218
Section 22
227
Section 31
319
Section 32
335
Section 33
356
Section 34
367
Section 35
372
Section 36
382
Section 37
388
Section 38
398
Section 39
407
Section 40
428
Section 41
433
Section 42
435
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Kader Abdolah (a pen name created in memoriam to friends who died under persecution by the current Iranian regime) was born in Iran in 1954. While a student of physics in Tehran, he joined a secret leftist party that fought against the dictatorship of the shah and the subsequent dictatorship of the ayatollahs. Abdolah wrote for an illegal journal and clandestinely published two books in Iran. In 1988, at the invitation of the United Nations, he arrived in the Netherlands as a political refugee. Kader Abdolah now writes in Dutch and is the author of several novels, including My Father's Notebook (also published by Canongate) and two collections of short stories, as well as works of non-fiction.

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