The Messiah in the Old and New Testaments

Front Cover
Stanley E. Porter
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Apr 26, 2007 - Religion - 268 pages
When the ancients talked about "messiah", what did they picture? Did that term refer to a stately figure who would rule, to a militant who would rescue, or to a variety of roles held by many? While Christians have traditionally equated the word "messiah" with Jesus, the discussion is far more complex. This volume contributes significantly to that discussion.

Ten expert scholars here address questions surrounding the concept of "messiah" and clarify what it means to call Jesus "messiah." The book comprises two main parts, first treating those writers who preceded or surrounded the New Testament (two essays on the Old Testament and two on extrabiblical literature) and then discussing the writers of the New Testament. Concluding the volume is a critical response by Craig Evans to both sections.

This volume will be helpful to pastors and laypersons wanting to explore the nature and identity of the Messiah in the Old and New Testament in order to better understand Jesus as Messiah.
 

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Contents

VI
13
VII
35
VIII
75
IX
90
X
115
XI
117
XII
144
XIII
165
XIV
190
XV
210
XVI
230
XVII
249
XVIII
255
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 29 - A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, and a bad tree cannot bear good fruit. Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.
Page 31 - Thus it is written, that the Messiah is to suffer and to rise from the dead on the third day, and that repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem.
Page 25 - I see him, but not now; I behold him, but not near — a star shall come out of Jacob, and a scepter shall rise out of Israel; it shall crush the borderlands' of Moab, and the territory"7 of all the Shethites.
Page 24 - The sceptre shall not depart from Judah, nor the ruler's staff from between his feet, until he comes to whom it belongs: and to him shall be the obedience of the peoples.
Page xii - WBC Word Biblical Commentary WMANT Wissenschaftliche Monographien zum Alten und Neuen Testament...
Page xi - JJS Journal of Jewish Studies JNES Journal of Near Eastern Studies...

About the author (2007)

Stanley E. Porter is president, dean, professor of New Testament, and holder of the Roy A. Hope Chair in Christian Worldview at McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, Ontario.

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