The Politics of Suffering: Indigenous Australia and the End of the Liberal Consensus

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Melbourne Univ. Publishing, 2009 - Political Science - 268 pages
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Combining original observation with deep emotional engagement, this provocative book argues that, despite claims to the contrary, the quality of life of indigenous Australians did not improve between 1970 and the year 2000. Debunking past attempts to improve the tragic situation of many Aboriginal communities, this record discusses the reforms thatægranted land rights andæencouraged traditional cultures, in the hope that this empowerment would be beneficial. Erroneously, however, this same period saw a decline in safety, health, literacy, numeracy, and employment within the Aboriginal community. Groundbreaking and informative, this document offers fresh insight and hope for a new era in indigenous politics.

 

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User Review  - CraigHodges - LibraryThing

Will be reading this book slowly, very slowly. Sutton finds himself in the opening pages beyond being guarded. He writes from a perspective of having seen enough, having had (adopted) family members ... Read full review

Contents

After Consensus
14
Rage and Its Reasons
42
The Trouble with Culture
63
Violence Ancient and Modern
87
Bodies Politic
115
Customs Not in Common
144
Unusual Couples
163
On Feeling Reconciled
194
Notes
216
Bibliography
240
Index
263
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About the author (2009)

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Peter Sutton is an anthropologist and linguist who has worked with Aboriginal people since 1969. He is an Australian Research Council Professorial Fellow at the University of Adelaide and atæthe South Australian Museum and a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. He is the author and editor of 12 books, including Native Title in Australia: An Ethnographic Perspective.

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