The Soul and Its Instrumental Body: A Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Philosophy of Living Nature

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BRILL, Jan 1, 2003 - Philosophy - 429 pages
For more than 1800 years it has been supposed that Aristotle viewed the soul as the entelechy of the visible body which is 'equipped with organs'. This book argues that in actual fact he saw the soul as the entelechy of a natural body 'that serves as its instrument'. This correction puts paid to W. Jaeger's hypothesis of a three-phase development in Aristotle. The author of this book defends the unity of Aristotle's philosophy of living nature in De anima, in the biological treatises, and in the lost dialogues. Aristotle should therefore be regarded as the author of the notion of the 'vehicle of the soul' and of a 'non-Platonic' dualism. The current understanding of his influence on Hellenistic philosophy needs to change accordingly.

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Contents

Introduction
1
The modern debate on Aristotles psychology
13
Pneuma as the organon of the soul in De motu
31
What body is suitable for receiving the soul
47
Aristotles new psychology in De anima II 12
69
The soul in its instrumental body as the sailor in
123
Aristotles problems with the standard psycho
136
in two?
145
Aristotles lost works the consequences
230
The information on Aristotles Eudemus
238
The fifth element as the substance of
258
The comparison of the steersman and his ship
304
The souls bondage according to a lost work
315
The integration of the psychology of Aristotles
358
Final considerations and conclusions
374
Bibliography
383

Fire above the relation of the soul to the body
183
Pneuma and the theory of soul in De mundo
210
The ultimate problem how did Aristotle relate
216

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About the author (2003)

Abraham P. Bos, Ph.D. (1971) in Philosophy, M.A. Classics, M.A. Philosophy, Free University of Amsterdam, is Professor in Ancient and Patristic Philosophy at the Free University of Amsterdam. He has published extensively on Aristotle and on Philo of Alexandria and the Churchfathers.

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