The Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground was Built and how it Changed the City Forever

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Atlantic, Jan 1, 2004 - Public-private sector cooperation - 351 pages
5 Reviews
Since Victorian times, London's Underground has made an extraordinary contribution to the economy of the capital and has played a vital role in the daily life of generations of Londoners. This wide-ranging history of the Underground celebrates the vision and determination of the Victorian pioneers who conceived this revolutionary transport system and the men who tunnelled to make the Tube. From the early days of steam to electrification, via the Underground's contribution to twentieth-century industrial design and its role during two world wars, the story comes right in to the present with its sleek, driverless trains and the wrangles over the future of the system.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bevok - LibraryThing

Very interesting subject. To anyone who lives in London the underground is an unavoidable aspect of life. It was both a revolutionary development technologically and in terms of its impact on London's development and life. An interesting story, well told. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - elimatta - LibraryThing

The subtitle should be "A Business History of the Underground". Business history is fine if you like it, but doesn't appeal to me. I was looking for a mixture of social history and engineering history. Very little of either here. Read full review


The Phantom Railway
Midwife to the Underground
The Underground Arrives

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