The Trial of the Templars

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Sep 7, 2006 - History
The Templars fought against Islam in the crusader east for nearly two centuries. During that time the original small band grew into a formidable army, backed by an extensive network of preceptories in the Latin West. In October 1307, the members of this seemingly invulnerable and respected Order were arrested on the orders of Philip IV, King of France and charged with serious heresies, including the denial of Christ, homosexuality and idol worship. The ensuing proceedings lasted for almost five years and culminated in the suppression of the Order. The motivations of the participants and the long-term repercussions of the trial have been the subject of intense and unresolved controversy, which still has resonances in our own time. In this new edition of his classic account, Malcolm Barber discusses the trial in the context of new work on the crusades, heresy, the papacy and the French monarchy.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tole_lege - LibraryThing

If you want to know what happened at the trial(s), start here. In fact, start with Barber all through this period and THEN go read some of the... alternatives. Not the most scintillating of reads - it ... Read full review

Contents

Front Cover
4
The Participants
5
which he cannot pay and if he is healthy in
14
to Philip of Plessis the Master that the Templars
17
In contrast others idealised him William of Nogaret whose elevation
42
that they can have the money immediately They seized horses
49
man was included to differentiate from aristocracy or the rule
56
orders These Orders
58
He continued that as a consequence it is a marvellous
160
impossible and most foul Those who brought such lies to
161
with destructive fury all the brothers of the Order in
169
commission should assure each witness of the secrecy of his
170
The End of Resistance
175
Suddenly it was clear that King Philip was determined to
176
Order for about seven years His name was Aimery of
180
the mantle of the Order at the council of Sens
188

The Arrests
59
was the accumulation of accusations and so probable did the
60
Let it be manifest to your royal majesty that I
66
which the Templars were accused in the presence of the
67
and frightened man advanced in years and worn down by
78
carefully prepared for the day after the actual arrests before
79
in this way92 This technique frequently involves promises as well
81
which was introduced as a result of a promise of
84
The Papal Intervention
88
1305 just about the time that he had been crowned
90
dignity they should disdain if as men they should have
113
The Papal and Episcopal Inquiries
116
that the points concerning the denial of Christ and the
119
be produced when the ecclesiastical authorities required32 Between 9 and
125
inquire against individual Templars36 Clement was not however satisfied
126
instituted and a general council had been planned to consider
127
whereupon he saide that he marveled that the kinge would
128
The Defence of the Order
141
those belonging to the Order but also in all parts
144
He said after some interval in terror of his soul
195
lied on the last Saturday gone by and that
196
The Charges
202
Antonio Sicci of Vercelli who was not a member of
210
The Trial in Other Countries
217
of Turri a priest with twentynine years service was the
238
the proper observances of the Church with regard to confession
239
he repented that he had said that he was God
243
At the end the said preceptor opened a casket situated
247
of great famine when a measure of grain which commonly
252
The Suppression
259
lord called John of Heure claimed that
261
frivolous and vexatious allegations concerning a defence Ptolemy of
264
indeed all of them excepting five or six from the
265
The Aragonese proved to be correct for on 2 March
266
French government Similar circumstances had prevailed at Poitiers in
269
were ordered to appear before the relevant provincial council within
279
unexpectedly two of them namely the grand master and the
282
Conclusion
283

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11 - Leontios Makhairas, Recital Concerning the Sweet Land of Cyprus entitled Chronicle, ed.
Page 7 - Ch. Lea, A History of the Inquisition of the middle ages...

About the author (2006)

Malcolm Barber is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History at the University of Reading. His other publications include The Two Cities. Medieval Europe 1050320 (1992, 2004), The Cathars. Dualist Heretics in Languedoc (2000) and The New Knighthood. A History of the Order of the Temple (Cambridge,1994).

Bibliographic information