The World Ahead: An Anthropologist Anticipates the Future

Front Cover
Berghahn Books, 2005 - Social Science - 348 pages

Born in the first year of the 20th century, it is fitting that Margaret Mead should have been one of the first anthropologists to use anthropological analysis to study the future course of human civilization. This volume collects, for the first time, her writings on the future of humanity and how humans can shape that future through purposeful action. For Mead, the study of the future was born out of her lifelong interest in processes of change. Many of these papers were originally published as conference proceedings or in limited-circulation journals, testimony before government bodies and chapters in works edited by others. They show Mead's wisdom, prescience and concern for the future of humanity.

 

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Contents

The Family in the Future
35
Human Differences and World Order
55
Unique Possibilities of the Melting Pot
65
The Psychology of Warless Man
75
Beyond the Nuclear Family
85
Patterns of Worldwide Cultural Change
91
One WorldBut Which Language?
111
The University and Institutional Change
119
Man On the Moon
247
Education for Humanity
253
Kalinga Prize Acceptance Speech
263
A Note on Contributions of Anthropology
271
The Kind of City We Want
277
Prospects for World Harmony
285
Opening Address to The Society
291
Changing Perspectives on Modernization
299

Changing Cultural Patterns of Work
131
New YearsA Universal Birthday
163
Alternatives to War
169
The Crucial Role of the Small City
185
Statement ſon Aging And Retirement
209
Some Social Consequences of
227
Ways to Deal with the Current Social
315
Discussion about How Anthropologists
321
Our OpenEnded Future
329
Index
339
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About the author (2005)

Margaret Mead served as Curator of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History from 1925 to 1969. She began her career with a study of youth and adolescence in Samoan society, published as Coming of Age in Samoa (1928). She published prolifically, becoming a seminal figure in anthropology, and was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1979.