The art and practice of etching

Front Cover
1849
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Forty years of practice in the various methods of engraving, with some natural mechanical genius, may be considered as some qualification for this task. Nor will my endeavours prove less successful from the fact that during a great portion of that time I have been in the habit of giving lessons in the library, parlour, and drawing-room, by which I must naturally have acquired a method of mitigating, and, where practicable, avoiding the unpleasant processes of the Art.
Page 14 - ... ounce or more,) add your resin and bees-wax, broken in small pieces; when melted, work the ingredients well together with a stick until thoroughly incorporated, then pour into a basin of cold water; as it gets cold, work it well with the hands by pulling out into lengths and doubling it together again: the more it is worked the better it will be for use. Should it turn out brittle, return it broken to the pipkin, and add more oil; work it well together as before; pour it into water, and work...
Page 8 - Unlike a pencil or water-color drawing, unlike a painting in oils, or a work in marble, which can only gratify those who at one time examine it, the impressions from an etching may be multiplied by thousands to grace the portfolios, the albums and the scrap books of near and distant relatives and friends, and to awaken reminiscences of the etcher and giver when otherwise they would not arise.
Page 55 - RESIN-GROUND ENGRAVING. This style of engraving is well adapted to ornamental work, as great depth of colour can be obtained. The process is extremely simple. The best white resin should be reduced to powder by pestle and mortar, then placed in a fine doubled flannel, and tied up in a bag...
Page 56 - ... from the plate,) which will force the powdered resin to escape from the flannel bag, and falling on the hot plate, will there fix itself in small spots, something similar to the aqua-tint deposit, but much more enduring. The stopping out process is exactly the same as in the aqua-tint. By repeating the process with the flannel bag, a positive black ground may be procured, as dark and more enduring than a mezzotinto ground, which may be scraped on much in the same way.
Page 25 - ... into the turpentine bottle, and with its point work up some of the ground on the margin of the plate, and therewith stop out the objectionable marks. When set it will resist the aqua-fortis. BORDERING THE PLATE. In cold weather the wax will be too hard to be rolled out with the hand...
Page 18 - ... points, not through the drawing, but close to it, so that the pressure of the brass head secures both the drawing and tracing paper from moving. Go carefully over all the lines of your drawing with an H pencil, occasionally placing a piece of white paper between the drawing and the tracing paper, to ascertain that you have not neglected any part of the lines on the drawing.
Page 31 - The dry point may next be used. For this purpose the needle No. 3, well pointed, may be employed, as indenture must be made by pressure of the hand. For interlining the parts which are too weak, and uniting lines neglected in the etching, the dry point will be sufficient ; but the pressure will leave a projection or burr on the plate, which must be carefully removed by the sharp...
Page 17 - No. 2 rather less than the fourth of the nitre; pour the bottle three parts full of water; with a slow action pass it into one of your pint jugs, and back again to the bottle, to unite it well. In bottle No. 3 put one half of the remaining nitre; water it as before; see that the nitric acid in bottle No. 1. is well stoppered, and cover it with a piece of old glove. TRACING, AND TRACING PAPER.
Page 56 - ... in the right hand, strike it against the left (the bag must be held some distance from the plate,) which will force the powdered resin to escape from the flannel bag, and falling on the hot plate, will there fix itself in small spots, something similar to the aqua-tint deposit, but much more enduring. The stopping out process is exactly the same as in the aqua-tint. By repeating...

Bibliographic information