This Fleeting World: A Short History of Humanity

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Berkshire Publishing, 2008 - History - 113 pages
4 Reviews
"I first became an avid student of David Christian by watching his course, Big History, on DVD, and so I am very happy to see his enlightening presentation of the world's history captured in these essays. I hope it will introduce a wider audience to this gifted scientist and teacher." --Bill Gates A great historian can make clear the connections between the first Homo sapiens and today's version of the species, and a great storyteller can make those connections come alive. David Christian is both, and This Fleeting World: A Short History of Humanity makes the journey - from the earliest foraging era to our own modern era - a fascinating one. Enter This Fleeting World - and give up the preconception that anything old is boring.

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User Review  - paulrwaibel44 - LibraryThing

This is a great introduction to what is called "Big History," an attempt to cast world history as a metanarrative. As one who has taught history as a college prof for more than thirty years, I highly recommend this brief (112 pages) introductory history. Read full review

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I had to read this book for school, and it wasn't as terrible as I thought it was going to be. I didn't enjoy it or anything, but it was very interesting. If you are looking for a brief summary of the history of humanity this is definitely the book for you.


The Era of Foragers
The Agrarian Era
The Modern Era
Periodization in World History
About the Author
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About the author (2008)

David Christian is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Macquarie University, Sydney where he has taught since 1975. His BA and DPhil are from Oxford University. His previous publications include "Bread and Salt: A Social and Economic History of Food and Drink in Russia" (1982), "Living Water: Vodka and Russian Society on the Eve of Emancipation" (1990) and "Imperial and Soviet Russia: Power, Privilege and the Challenge of Modernity" (1997).

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