Turtle Island

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New Directions Publishing, 1974 - Poetry - 114 pages
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These Pulitzer Prize-winning poems and essays by the author of No Nature range from the lucid, lyrical, and mystical to the political. All, however, share a common vision: a rediscovery of North America and the ways by which we might become true natives of the land for the first time.
 

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Won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, 1975. Snyder was on a backpacking trip when it was announced and couldn't be notified until he returned.

Review: Turtle Island

User Review  - Jennifer - Goodreads

Am revisiting Gary Snyder's poetry, the subject of my bachelors thesis, during subway rides. This book especially was so formative for me. Reading it is like praying. Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
4
III
6
IV
7
V
9
VI
10
VII
11
VIII
12
XXVIII
43
XXIX
44
XXX
45
XXXI
47
XXXII
50
XXXIII
51
XXXIV
52
XXXV
54

IX
15
X
16
XI
18
XII
19
XIII
20
XIV
21
XV
26
XVI
27
XVII
28
XVIII
31
XIX
32
XX
33
XXI
34
XXII
35
XXIII
37
XXIV
39
XXV
40
XXVI
41
XXVII
42
XXXVI
58
XXXVII
59
XXXVIII
60
XXXIX
61
XL
62
XLI
63
XLII
64
XLIII
65
XLIV
66
XLV
73
XLVI
74
XLVII
75
XLVIII
76
XLIX
77
L
78
LI
82
LII
91
LIII
113
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About the author (1974)

Born in 1930 in San Francisco, Gary Snyder grew up in the rural Pacific Northwest. He graduated from Reed College in 1951 with degrees in anthropology and literature, and later, 1953-56, studied Japanese and Chinese civilization at Berkeley, returning there to teach in the English Department. Throughout these years, Gary Snyder worked at various outdoor jobs--as a seaman, as a lookout in Mt. Baker National Forest, as a choker setter for a logging company, on a trail crew at Yosemite National Park. These experiences are integrally reflected in such works as Riprap and Myths and Texts. As he has remarked, "I've come to realize that the rhythms of my poems follow the rhythm of the physical work I'm doing and the life I'm leading at any given time--which makes the music in my head which creates the line." After participating in the San Francisco revival, the beginning of the beat poetry movement, with Ginsberg, Whalen, Rexroth and McClure, Snyder quietly went off to Japan in 1955 where he stayed for eighteen months, living in a Zen monastery. In 1958, he joined the tanker "Sappa Creek" and traveled around the world. In early 1959 he again returned to Japan where, apart from six months in India, he studied Kyoto under Oda Sesso Roshi, the Zen master and Head Abbot of Daitoku-Ji. He has spent further time (1966-67) in Japan on a Bollingen research grant. In 1969 he received a Guggenheim grant and toured the Southwestern United States visiting various Indian tribes.

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