Using Phonics to Teach Reading & Spelling

Front Cover
SAGE, Aug 21, 2007 - Education - 176 pages
Includes CD-Rom

Times Educational Supplement Star Read!

'This is an authoritative yet lively and eminently readable book. It is well grounded in both the latest academic theory and experienced hands-on pedagogic practice, and it summarises succinctly the implications of the recent Rose Report, giving a masterly exposition of both synthetic and analytic phonics and their places in the processes of learning to read and spell.

Practical and organisational issues are tackled in a most supportive way, with very useful checklists and photocopiable proformas on an accompanying CD.

The book also provides and excellent guide to provision for professional development, involving the use of lesson observation and part of the evaluation and planning cycle for CPD. Its style is clear and well signposted with subheadings, case-study boxes to illuminate points, and with aims given at the start of each chapter as well as challenging points for reflection and guides to further reading at the ends.

Every staff room should have one!' - Dorothy Latham, Primary Education Consultant, English specialist and author of How Children Learn to Write

'Synthetic phonics may well be only one tool for teaching reading and spelling, but it is the single most important one' - Ruth Kelly, Education Secretary, March 2006

'Teachers - and particularly Literacy Co-ordinators or SENCOs - who are enthusiastic about children's learning and about their own professional development will undoubtedly benefit from using this book and CD, with its combination of useful explanation and practical resources to support the implementation of the ideas' - Lorna Gardiner, General Adviser, Foundation Stage, North Eastern Education and Library Board, Northern Ireland

Are you looking for practical advice on how to teach phonics?

By giving the reader a basic introduction to teaching reading and spelling using phonics, this book will provide you with easy-to-use ideas for your classrooms. Following on from the recommendations of the Rose Report, the author explains why teaching phonics works, and how to present irregular as well as straightforward features of English.

The book:

o contains practical examples and activities for teachers

o explains the basis of synthetic and analytic phonics

o gives advice on choosing the best resources

o looks at how to help the weakest readers

o includes a CD Rom with photocopiable resources and INSET materials

o contains a glossary of key terms

Literacy Co-ordinators, teachers and teaching assistants will find this an invaluable resource.

From inside the book

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Contents

1 Phonics Why and How
1
2 Key Elements in Synthetic Phonics
13
3 Synthetic Phonics and Language Development
34
4 How Do We Explain and Tackle Irregularity?
46
5 Phonics and English Spelling
56
6 Phonics and more advanced literacy skills
77
7 Resources
84
8 What Additional Techniques Can Help the Weakest Readers?
103
9 Professional Development
123
GLOSSARY
136
KEY PATTERNS IN ENGLISH SPELLING
138
REFERENCES
152
INDEX
155
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 38 - Three blind mice, three blind mice, See how they run, see how they run, They all ran after the farmer's wife, She cut off their tails with a carving knife, Did you ever see such a sight in your life As three blind mice?
Page 33 - The child would try to grasp and to remedy the situation in talking to himself: "Where's the pencil? I need a blue pencil. Never mind, I'll draw with the red one and wet it with water; it will become dark and look like blue.
Page 34 - Writing also requires deliberate analytical action on the part of the child. In speaking, he is hardly conscious of the sounds he pronounces and quite unconscious of the mental operations he performs. In writing, he must take cognizance of the sound structure of each word, dissect it, and reproduce it in alphabetical symbols, which he must have studied and memorized before.
Page ix - ... synthetic phonics, offers the vast majority of young children the best and most direct route to becoming skilled readers and writers.
Page 151 - Balmuth, M. (1982). The roots of phonics: A historical introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Page 10 - The Early Years Foundation Stage and the renewed literacy framework must be compatible with each other and make sure that expectations about continuity and progression in phonic work are expressed explicitly in the new guidance.
Page 34 - Vygotsky, requires deliberate analytical action on the part of the child. In speaking, he is hardly conscious of the sounds he pronounces, and quite unconscious of the mental operations he performs.
Page 9 - Phonic work should be set within a broad and rich language curriculum that takes full account of developing the four interdependent strands of language: speaking, listening, reading and writing, and enlarging children's stock of words.
Page 9 - High-quality, systematic phonic work as defined by the review should be taught discretely. The knowledge, skills and understanding that constitute...
Page 86 - It divides phonic teaching into five basic skills: 1 . Learning the letter sounds. 2. Learning letter formation. 3. Blending - for reading. 4. Identifying the sounds in words - for writing . 5. Tricky words - irregular words.

About the author (2007)

I have almost forty years' experience of teaching people of all ages to read and write, to learn foreign languages, and to understand and use arithmetic. This website puts what I've learned along the way at your and your children's service, wherever you happen to be. It also keeps a critical eye on the activities of schools, examining boards and the government, with occasional notes on other things, including music

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