Words of conflict, words of war: how the language we use in political processes sparks fighting

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Praeger, May 30, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 220 pages
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Words of Conflict, Words of War: How the Language We Use in Political Processes Sparks Fighting is a fascinating exploration of the narratives leaders use to position both themselves and others in the course of political processes that lead to peace or conflict. Drawing on the relatively new field of "positioning theory," expert essays provide insights into the ways words position usfor better or worseand influence our intended results. The focus on narratives, from the interpersonal to the international, leads to a better understanding of political processes and conflict resolution.Part one of the study deals with micropolitics and personal positioning. Part two explores positioning by political parties and factions. Links between micro and macro are illustrated by leadership studies of individuals such as President Barak Obama, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, President George W. Bush, Governor Sarah Palin, and the Reverend Ian Paisley. The focus throughout is on how a leader can use language to redirect collective politics in support of conflict or of peace.

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Contents

Words Conflicts and Political Processes
1
Do I Have to Say Yes? A Positioning Theory
31
A Positioning Theory Analysis of Language
47
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

FATHALI M. MOGHADDAM is Professor of Psychology at Georgetown University. An internationally known, Iranian-born and British-educated psychologist, he has extensive consulting and research experience regarding intergroup conflict and terrorism. He previously held positions with McGill University and the United Nations. Moghaddam taught and researched in Iran for five years immediately following the 1978-79 revolution. He is the author of numerous books, including his forthcoming volume Multiculturalism, Democracy and Intergroup Relations (2007). Moghaddam was awarded the 2007 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict and Violence, Division 48 of the American Psychological Association.

ROM HARRE has been a longtime University Lecturer on the Philosophy of Science at Oxford University. He is also a Emeritus Fellow of Linacre College, Oxford, and has been visiting professor at universities around the world. He has authored or co-authored nearly 60 books.