Writing and Difference

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Routledge, 1978 - Philosophy - 446 pages
3 Reviews
In the 1960s a radical concept emerged from the great French thinker Jacques Derrida. He called the new process deconstruction. Rewriting the ways in which we use language and literature, deconstruction affected every form of intellectual thought, from literary criticism to popular culture. It also criticized the entire tradition of Western philosophy, from Plato to Bataille."

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I liked very much this book. It is smart, intuitive, helpful to understand the mode of intellect operations in free associations. It gives basses to skill an alert thinking which is not stocked in classical reason. It helps to open boundaries of logic which are always in strive to reshape the world.

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User Review  - Michael Murray - Goodreads

It is taking so long to get anywhere - admittedly the journey is throwing up (!) v interesting asides and avenues. I do sometimes wonder though, for instance, discussing Kant in a contemporary context ... Read full review

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About the author (1978)

Jacques Derrida was born in El-Biar, Algeria on July 15, 1930. He graduated from the École Normal Supérieure in 1956. He taught philosophy and logic at both the University of Paris and the École Normal Supérieure for around 30 years. His works of philosophy and linguistics form the basis of the school of criticism known as deconstruction. This theory states that language is an inadequate method to give an unambiguous definition of a work, as the meaning of text can differ depending on reader, time, and context. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 40 books on various aspects of deconstruction including Of Grammatology, Glas, The Postcard: From Socrates to Freud and Beyond, and Ulysses Gramophone: Hear Say Yes in Joyce. He died of pancreatic cancer on October 9, 2004 at the age of 74.

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