Operations Carried on at the Pyramids of Gizeh in 1837:: With an Account of a Voyage Into Upper Egypt and an Appendix, Volume 3

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James Fraser, Regent Street., 1842 - Pyramids
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volume III

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Page 101 - Cubit, a measure of length equal to the distance from the elbow to the end of the middle finger.
Page 107 - ... its merits at a first glance ; for though, to an untutored eye, there remains so little of the features as scarcely to give more than a general idea of the human head, yet...
Page 111 - ... unapt resemblance to a cascade of water. Even when the sides appeared most firm, if the labourers suspended their work but for an hour, they found on their return that they had the greater part of it to do over again. This was particularly the case on the southern side of the paw, where the whole of the people were employed for seven days without making any sensible advance, the sand rolling down in one continual and regular torrent.
Page 111 - ... depth of the base ; for, in spite of every precaution, the slightest breath of wind, or concussion set all the surrounding particles of sand in motion, so that the sloping sides began to crumble away, and mass after mass to come tumbling down, till the whole surface bore no unapt resemblance to a cascade of water. Even when the sides appeared most firm, if the labourers suspended their work but for an hour, they found on their return that they had the greater part of it to do over again.
Page 107 - The contemplative turn of the eye,' (it is an artist who speaks,) ' the mild expression of the mouth, and the beautiful disposition of the drapery at the angle of the forehead, sufficiently attest the admirable skill of the artist in its execution. Yet there is no attention paid to those proportions we are accustomed to admire, nor does the pleasing impression which it produces result from any known rule adopted in its execution; it may rather be attributed to the unstudied simplicity in the conception...
Page 111 - for any person unused to operations of this kind, to form the smallest idea of the difficulties which Captain Caviglia had to surmount, more particularly when working at the depth of the base; for, in spite of every precaution, the slightest breath of wind, or concussion set all the surrounding particles of sand in motion, so that the sloping sides began to crumble away, and mass after mass to come tumbling down, till the whole surface bore no unapt resemblance to a cascade of water. Even when the...
Page 119 - ... river), It has been determined by the inhabitants of the village of Busiris in the nome of Letopolis, who live near the Pyramids, and the local clerks or collectors, and the village collectors in it, to vote and dedicate a stele of stone (15).
Page 44 - ... large apartment described in his narrative. This communication is a horizontal gallery one hundred and sixty-six feet long, and the recess is seventy feet above the floor. " The southern end of the gallery," observes Colonel Vyse, " was stopped up with sand ; but for the length of one hundred and sixty feet from the interior it was open, and did not seem to have been previously visited, as nearly thirty mummies were found in it apparently undisturbed. They had neither coffins nor sarcophagi,...
Page 61 - The stony surface of the desert had been made level by a layer of fine sand, confined on all sides by a stone platform, 14 feet 6 inches wide, and 2 feet 9 inches thick, which supported the external casing ; and the Pyramid was built upon the sand, which was firm and solid. Mr. Perring has met with other instances in Egypt where sand has been thus used;4 and, provided it be retained in its place, it apparently may be depended upon.
Page 38 - He is lost in the immense expanse of desert which he sees full of pyramids before him. Struck with terror from the unusual scene of vastness opened all at once upon leaving the palm-trees, he becomes dispirited from the effect of...

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