The Zen of Magic Squares, Circles, and Stars: An Exhibition of Surprising Structures across Dimensions

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Princeton University Press, Nov 28, 2011 - Mathematics - 432 pages
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Humanity's love affair with mathematics and mysticism reached a critical juncture, legend has it, on the back of a turtle in ancient China. As Clifford Pickover briefly recounts in this enthralling book, the most comprehensive in decades on magic squares, Emperor Yu was supposedly strolling along the Yellow River one day around 2200 B.C. when he spotted the creature: its shell had a series of dots within squares. To Yu's amazement, each row of squares contained fifteen dots, as did the columns and diagonals. When he added any two cells opposite along a line through the center square, like 2 and 8, he always arrived at 10. The turtle, unwitting inspirer of the ''Yu'' square, went on to a life of courtly comfort and fame.

Pickover explains why Chinese emperors, Babylonian astrologer-priests, prehistoric cave people in France, and ancient Mayans of the Yucatan were convinced that magic squares--arrays filled with numbers or letters in certain arrangements--held the secret of the universe. Since the dawn of civilization, he writes, humans have invoked such patterns to ward off evil and bring good fortune. Yet who would have guessed that in the twenty-first century, mathematicians would be studying magic squares so immense and in so many dimensions that the objects defy ordinary human contemplation and visualization?

Readers are treated to a colorful history of magic squares and similar structures, their construction, and classification along with a remarkable variety of newly discovered objects ranging from ornate inlaid magic cubes to hypercubes. Illustrated examples occur throughout, with some patterns from the author's own experiments. The tesseracts, circles, spheres, and stars that he presents perfectly convey the age-old devotion of the math-minded to this Zenlike quest. Number lovers, puzzle aficionados, and math enthusiasts will treasure this rich and lively encyclopedia of one of the few areas of mathematics where the contributions of even nonspecialists count.

 

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User Review  - themulhern - LibraryThing

This book was disconcerting and seemed rather chaotic. I think I got to page 5. I will try again. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
CHAPTER ONE Magic Construction
37
CHAPTER TWO Classification
65
Squares Cubes and Tesseracts
147
Circles and Spheres
297
Stars Hexagons and Other Beauties
325
Some Final Thoughts
369
Notes
375
For Further Reading
395
Index
397
About the Author
403
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Clifford Pickover is the author of over twenty books on a broad range of topics in science and art, a columnist for Odyssey, and an inventor. His books include Surfing Through Hyperspace: Understanding Higher Universes in Six Easy Lessons, Wonders of Numbers: Adventures in Mathematics, Mind, and Meaning, and The Loom of God: Mathematical Tapestries at the Edge of Time.

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