A Companion to the Theatre, Or, A View of Our Most Celebrated Dramatic Pieces: In which the Plan, Characters, and Incidents of Each are Particularly Explained : Interspers'd with Remarks Historical, Critical and Moral

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J. Nourse, 1747 - English drama
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Page 102 - A fleet ion she has for him; but deprives him of all his Honours in Consideration of what she thought owing to herself as Queen. Here the Earl is no longer able to restrain the Impetuosity of his Nature, he throws his Staff at her Feet, accompanied with some Expressions, that sound like Reproaches; on which the Queen, inflamed with Wrath, gives him a Blow. He lays his Hand on his Sword, and it is in vain that Southampton conjures him to be more moderate; he goes on repeating his Services, and accusing...
Page 105 - ... Enemies to the unfortunate Earl. It must be confessed there is something in this Play capable of raising Compassion in the most insensible Hearts; but then it is wholly owing to the Story; for the Diction is every where very bad, and in some Places so low, that it even becomes unnatural, and shews our Author little acquainted with Courts, when he puts into the Mouth of the prime Nobility such Language as a civil Coster-monger would blush to use.
Page 100 - ... was represented to the Queen as derogatory to her Honour, and as if the Earl was not free from some clandestine Designs. Burleigh and Raleigh, with some other Members of both Houses, petition her for Leave to impeach him of High Treason, which she not only refuses, but is extremely incensed that such a Motion has been made, repeats the former Services the Earl has done the Nation, and reproaches them with Malice, Envy, and Ingratitude: The Earl of Southampton, a very sincere friend of Essex,...
Page 104 - ... own Doom more deeply, in seeing that Mercy which is denied to himself bestowed on his Friend. To imbitter Death the more, she also intreats his unhappy Wife may be permitted to see him as he is conducting [sic] to the Block; to both these the Queen consents, but unhappily for the cruel Adviser, the Earl then gives a Letter to his Wife to be delivered to the Queen, who being at that Time in the Tower, receives it, soon after the Earl is carried off; and finding by it that the Earl had sent the...
Page 354 - Infefts, úsV. defcribing their different Natures, Qualities, and Ufe, as well for the common Service and Food of Man, as his Diverfions and Cure of his Maladies.
Page 103 - Grt1ce would too much betray a Weakness unworthy of a Queen, and waited till he should send the Ring, and beg his Life. Impatient till she knows him secure she sends Nottingham to him, who pretending the greatest Compassion for him, is intrusted by him with this precious Pledge of Safety, and with it a Petition to the Queen for Mercy. She had now all she wish'd in her Possession, and a full Opportunity to revenge the Contempt he had shewn her Charms. Instead of bearing his Message to the Queen, she...
Page 101 - ... for that Time his Enemies are put to Silence. The Queen however, not satisfied with his Behaviour, sends Orders to him to repair his past Conduct, and not quit Ireland till the Rebels are totally subdued, and all Things quieted; but the Earl hearing of the Accusations which had been brought against him, was too impatient to be clear'd ; and having engaged Tyronne to lay down his Arms, came over in spite of the Queen's positive Command to the contrary. His cruel Foes rejoiced; all his Friends...
Page 101 - ... his past Conduct, and not quit Ireland till the Rebels are totally subdued, and all Things quieted; but the Earl hearing of the Accusations which had been brought against him, was too impatient to be clear'd ; and having engaged Tyronne to lay down his Arms, came over in spite of the Queen's positive Command to the contrary. His cruel Foes rejoiced ; all his Friends were alarmed at this imprudent step ; the Countess of Rutland, to whom he was privately married, trembled for the Consequence ;...
Page 100 - Banks'* drama briefly with this work; it is evident that Banks drew on other sources — eg the novel makes no mention of the historical box on the ear. Troops being much harassed, and the Enemy posted very advantageously, he yielded to a Parley, which being very private, was represented to the Queen as derogatory to her Honour, and as if the Earl was not free from some clandestine Designs. Burleigh and Raleigh, with some other Members of both Houses, petition her for Leave to impeach him of High...
Page 99 - I reprint the English original in full: THE EARL OF ESSEX: OR, THE UNHAPPY FAVOURITE. A TRAGEDY. BY MR BANKS The Author is indebted for the Conduct of this Play to a Novel, intitled, The Secret History of Queen Elizabeth and the Earl of Essex...

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